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Christopher Pardell Koshari - Kachina Mixed Media Sculpture

Christopher Pardell Koshari - Kachina  Mixed Media Sculpture Christopher Pardell

Status: Only 1 Available | Condition: New | Edition:Limited Edition Mixed Media Sculpture | Edition Size: Limited Edition 66 of 2500 | Dim:9.50 | Christopher Pardell| Item #: LGKOSH

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    Price..: $ 625.00 USD
 Your Price: $ 562.50 USD
  At 10% Off You SAVE $62.50

As an option call 1-800-206-3715 to Layaway this item at the regular price of $625.00 - $208.33 over 60 days.

Promotion ends on Sunday, December 08, 2019
  There is 1 Available of Koshari - Kachina - Mixed Media Sculpture at this price.

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Available for purchase today, December  6, 2019

Koshari - Kachina  Mixed Media Sculpture

NOTES: Koshari, the colorful clown, and Mongwa, the Great Horned Owl - - two of the most enduring and important kachinas -- stand in balance with one another. Each symbolizes the contradictions of life, the opposition and balance between day and night, light and dark, life and death. The Owl knows the mysteries of the night, possesses the knowledge of good and evil in the world: Kpshari, like other clowns among the most sacred of figures, knows the mysteries of the human soul, of the good and evil within people. Together they define the eternal cycle of change, of life, death and rebirth. For Hopi, as for many other Native American cultures, owls are the symbols of ambiguity, birds of contradiction, who call through the night when all other birds sleep. Albert in the world while humans are asleep, ever vigilant, this fierce warrior of the night guards the Hopi against their unseen enemies, protecting them from evil whether in the physical or spiritual worlds. The Koshari clown is a figure that originated among the Rio Grande Pueblos, but is best known in its Hopi incarnations. The Hopi refer to it as the Hano or Tewa clown, and consider them to be the fathers of the kachinas. An important part of many different rituals, Koshari clowns are notable for exhibiting rambunctious behaviors which run counter to proper Hopi behavior: loud and boisterous talking, immoderate and mischievous actions, and uncontrollable gluttony. Their public displays of improper behavior are a source of great amusement and merriment, often hilariously funny whether earthy or sophisticated. Often, the Koshari make fun of contemporary events, linking the eternal rituals of creation to the trivial incidents of the present. With their antics, the Koshari remind people of the ironies of their existence: that life is funny even at its most serious, that life is serious even at its most absurd..

Exactly What is Mixed Media?

It is a combination of various fine metals such as lost wax bronze, fine pewter, brass, copper, 24 karat gold vermeil and various hot torched acid patinas such as black nickel, rose copper, and turquoise, to highlight the sculpture. In addition, the sculpture may contain embellishments such as Lucite.

Koshari - Kachina  Mixed Media Sculpture by Christopher Pardell  is a limited edition sculpture that comes with a certificate of authenticity. Made In The USA.

With Your Purchase of $499.00 to $894.00 of Christopher Pardell sculptures, you can illuminate your Koshari - Kachina with this small Light Box as our gift to you to (valued at $79.00). One light box per customer.

**NOTE: This promotion does not apply to international orders or Layaways.**

Christopher Pardell bio

Christopher Pardell began sculpting at the tender age of four, and by his teenage years, Pardell had come to the realization that sculpting was to become his life's work. Influenced by the work of renowned sculptors Russell, Remington and Rodin, Pardell wanted to pursue his passion for realism. His formal education was laid aside in favor of an apprentice moldmaker position with a commercial statuary company, and it was there that he received what he considers to be his "real education in art." As an apprentice to the Italian master artisans who ran the statuary, Christopher rapidly learned the skills that would enable him to excel as an artist and earn the stature that has come with his success. Never sketching his designs on paper, Christopher composes all of his work in three dimensions, in a maquette. This unique approach explains the unparalleled beauty and detail that are the trademarks of his work. Christophers exceptional style and special talent have served to impress even the most discriminating collector. Currently, his artwork can be found in public and private collections throughout the world