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Bob Coronato June 9th in the Black Hills P'ard all I remembert' Canvas

Bob Coronato June 9th in the Black Hills P'ard all I remembert'  Canvas Bob Coronato

Status: Available | Condition: New | Edition:Limited Edition Canvas | Edition Size: Limited Edition Of 50 | Dim:48 inches wide by 22 inches tall | Bob Coronato| Item #: CO00007

Price: $ 795.00 USD      

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Bob Coronato June 9th in the Black Hills P'ard all I remembert'  Canvas is eligible for layaway in 3 equal payments of $265.00 over 60 days.

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11/15/2019  $265.00 1st payment
12/15/2019  $265.00 2nd payment
1/14/2020  $265.00 3rd & final payment

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Available for purchase today, November  15, 2019

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"June 9th in the Black Hills... P'ard all I remember
...t'  Canvas

NOTES: June 9th in the Black Hills
P'ard all I remember, 'twas a cold som-bitch
by Bob Coronato

This was a day I'd been waiting for since I was a kid, says cowboy artist Bob Coronato about his latest release. Coronato relates the genesis for this piece, based on his experience working on a ranch on the border of South Dakota and Wyoming. I was there to help the Foreman, a colorful, tough old man of few words, move cows to their summer pasture. We got up at 4:30 a.m. and my friend George suggested I wear my heavy winter gear. Since it was 75 degrees the day before, I thought he was pulling a prank. I decided not to take a chance and brought the gear. I saddled up my horse, which was bucking and kicking to shake out the cold.

Hoping to get a good view of the thousands of cows snaking up the limestone canyon, I went to the front and took a small bunch ahead to point the rest of the herd. The temperature dropped as we got higher into the mountains and the rain turned to large wet flakes covering the canyon walls. As the cows were heating up, steam started to rise off their backs until billowing clouds rose up through the canyon like a train puffing through the Black Hills. I was glad I had my slicker and wild rag around my neck as the snow turned into a blizzard. I sat tucked up under a pine tree branch listening to the flakes through the trees, hoping I'd never forget a detail of this amazing day. As the snow collected on my hat and the black dye ran down my back, I couldn't wait to paint this scene, unfolding before my eyes. With about ten inches of snow on the ground, George and I rode up the side of the herd yelling 'this is the life for me!'.

June 9th in the Black Hills P'ard all I remembert'  Canvas by Bob Coronato  is signed by the artist and comes with a certificate of authenticity.

Bob Coronato bio

BIOGRAPHY "We are at a clash of two different times: the traditional cowboy'n' ways are being overridden by the modern, quicker technologies. This is the focus of my paintings," Coronato says. "I try to document moments in time that show the ways of a fading lifestyle that so many people have admired." The subjects of Coronato's work remind people that there is still a remote, free West. The question the artist is asked most often is, "Do they really do that?" Coronato reflects, "Yes, they do - but not for much longer. The West is alive, it s just hiding in small corners of our country, trying to desperately hang on and not be forgotten." Coronato lives half the year in remote, eastern Wyoming and half the year in southern California. Upon graduating from Otis/Parsons Art School, he moved to Wyoming to pursue a career as a cowboy artist. His work has been shown at the High Plains Museum, the Coeur D'Alene Art Auction and in 1995 won Best of Show as the Pendleton Round Up Art Show. "