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1. Judy Larson Stars and Stripes   $295.00

“In times of triumph or tragedy, of victory or defeat, of elation or sorrow, the symbols on our flag represent unity,” explains artist Judy Larson. “Despite our differences, and they are many, we pull together in crises, congratulate each other on both national as well as personal successes, and empathize with those who are suffering.

Can You Find the Spirit Within?

“Stars and Stripes incorporates thirteen stripes on the feather in the horse’s tail, 50 stars on the horse’s rump, and a hidden eagle on the horse’s face. All are symbols of our great land, the United States of America.”

One might ask why Judy chose a horse as the expression of our unity. Horses,of course, changed their way of life for the Native People, who used them to hunt, to carry, to trade, and for war. Pioneers used horses to settle the American West and then to develop the land. The decorated horse depicted in Stars and Stripes, however, represents the unity enjoyed by both man and horse. Each relishes companionship and seek the security and safety provided by being together.

2. Judy Larson Stars and Stripes   $595.00

“In times of triumph or tragedy, of victory or defeat, of elation or sorrow, the symbols on our flag represent unity,” explains artist Judy Larson. “Despite our differences, and they are many, we pull together in crises, congratulate each other on both national as well as personal successes, and empathize with those who are suffering.

Can You Find the Spirit Within?

“Stars and Stripes incorporates thirteen stripes on the feather in the horse’s tail, 50 stars on the horse’s rump, and a hidden eagle on the horse’s face. All are symbols of our great land, the United States of America.”

One might ask why Judy chose a horse as the expression of our unity. Horses,of course, changed their way of life for the Native People, who used them to hunt, to carry, to trade, and for war. Pioneers used horses to settle the American West and then to develop the land. The decorated horse depicted in Stars and Stripes, however, represents the unity enjoyed by both man and horse. Each relishes companionship and seek the security and safety provided by being together.

3. Judy Larson The Lesson   $595.00

The entire wolf pack takes part in educating the young in the ways of the family: respect the elders and cooperate with the pack; play when you can, hunt when you must and rest in between; share your affections, voice your feelings and leave your mark. Can you find the paw prints left behind from the pack members that have learned this credo in the past?

4. Judy Larson The Buffalo Tipi   $395.00

“It took extraordinary courage to ride at full gallop into a thundering herd of buffalo armed with only a bow and arrow,” Judy Larson says with admiration. “Essential to that audacity was the Plains Indian’s trust in his mount. Often, it was not his war horse he used on the hunt, but one trained to negotiate through the unpredictable tangle of the stampede without panic and cut a wounded buffalo from the herd. Any mistake could lead to sudden death.

“The Appaloosa was a horse often favored for the hunt. The symbols adorning a steed for the hunt were different from those chosen for war. A Sacred Buffalo or Buffalo Tracks represented thanks to the Great Spirit for success in past hunts. The Sun of Happiness was used to call for blue skies. Hunting during a rain storm was dangerous and considered unfair to the Great Spirit and to the buffalo. The Circle of Vision was painted around the horse's eye for sharp vision and to help locate distant buffalo on the horizon. On the tipi behind, you’ll also see yellow and black stripes which indicated to the Plains Indians buffalo trails.”

A hunter’s wife would paint a symbol on the horse that represented her secret prayer to the Great Spirit for her husband on the hunt. If the man was not yet married, his mother would paint that symbol. If the hunt was successful, that symbol would most likely be used again. Judy’s hidden spirit, a buffalo head, symbolizes her hope for this warrior’s safe and victorious hunt.

The Buffalo Tipi is the fourth in Judy Larson’s highly popular series that explores the ties between the legends and lifestyle of the Plains Indian. The others include The Elk Dog Tipi, The Horse Tipi and The Crow Tipi. This Limited Edition Fine Art Canvas delivers gallery wrapped for display as a contemporary work of art.

5. Judy Larson Looking for Love   $395.00

In many ways, lone wolves look for love in much the same way that humans do. Finding a suitable mate, getting along well, courting and marrying and ultimately raising a family together are inherent in both species.

For the lone male wolf, however, he must leave the protection and companionship of his original pack, sometimes roam long distances and search for a female wolf who has set off on a similar mission. These quests take place during the breeding season, when scent is important and both wolves are compatible and ready to start an active courtship.


A pair might also meet quite accidentally, but most often the howling of a lone wolf, which can carry a mile or more, will signal to a potential partner that love is in the air. If that call receives a response, the two wolves locate each other by continuing to howl. Courtship ensues and there is much grinning, kissing and “talking.” If one, or neither, wolf is ready to breed at this point, they will spend days and sometimes several weeks together first, romping, playing, hunting, resting and feeding. They will wander in search of new territory, being careful not to intrude on, or invade, another pack’s territory. Love has blossomed and a new family is born.

6. Judy Larson Breaking the Silence Limited Edition   $225.00

Click here to view the hidden imagery in Breaking the Silence.

“Some years ago,” said artist Judy Larson, “I hiked alone for several days with my two dogs in the White Mountains of Arizona, home to the White Mountain Apache Tribe. The scenery was nothing short of breathtaking and I watched eagerly for wildlife. I knew that black bear, bobcats, deer, elk, coyotes, foxes, skunks and other animals were native to this area, but there were no signs of any of them. I was stunned that not once in two days did I hear a single bird, see one animal track or catch sight of even a small rodent. The wilderness was eerily silent.

The forest trees seemed to be saying to me, “We are the only ones left to testify as to what once was, but no longer is.” So, I imagined that a number of animals were present around me, hidden just out of sight: a mountain lion, an eagle, a fox, and a wolf. And, in my mind’s eye, I saw a young grizzly padding his way softly through the first light snow of fall (the last grizzly was killed in Arizona in 1939).

7. Judy Larson Breaking the Silence   $550.00

Click here to view the hidden imagery in Breaking the Silence.

“Some years ago,” said artist Judy Larson, “I hiked alone for several days with my two dogs in the White Mountains of Arizona, home to the White Mountain Apache Tribe. The scenery was nothing short of breathtaking and I watched eagerly for wildlife. I knew that black bear, bobcats, deer, elk, coyotes, foxes, skunks and other animals were native to this area, but there were no signs of any of them. I was stunned that not once in two days did I hear a single bird, see one animal track or catch sight of even a small rodent. The wilderness was eerily silent.

The forest trees seemed to be saying to me, “We are the only ones left to testify as to what once was, but no longer is.” So, I imagined that a number of animals were present around me, hidden just out of sight: a mountain lion, an eagle, a fox, and a wolf. And, in my mind’s eye, I saw a young grizzly padding his way softly through the first light snow of fall (the last grizzly was killed in Arizona in 1939).

8. Judy Larson Wild in the Country SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $295.00

Judy’s newest Greenwich Workshop Fine Art edition is a delightful rendering of a wild foal and his dam. Basking both in the sunlight and in his mother’s love, this spring arrival celebrates his wildness and his joy of living. Nothing heralds springtime quite like new little ones born in the wild. Curious and eager to explore, there is still the desire to remain close by mother’s side, protected and adored.

Can you see the camouflaged image in Wild in the Country? Judy often conceals another image within her paintings. Sometimes it is a Native American legendary figure, sometimes an animal spirit and sometimes, as in this painting, she includes a companion species. Take a close look at the mother’s hide on the left. Joining this new foal is a hidden wolf pup who is equally ready to celebrate the new world around him!

9. Judy Larson American Horse Limited Edition   $245.00

American Horse, Oglala Sioux chief, is a study of adaptability. Although born on the Northern Plains, he became an American citizen when he was 67 years old. He fought brave battles for his people, but when he was 27 years old, lead the battle for his people in peace. He had five wives, including the daughter of war chief Red Cloud, but when only one living wife remained, joined the Episcopal church. He rode beside great chiefs in battle, including Red Cloud and He Dog, then rode briefly in Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. He fought against the invaders of his land, then traveled to Washington, rode down Pennsylvania Avenue and took part in treaty delegations. He lived free on the land he loved, then spent half his life on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

As I was researching American Horse, I found, once again, how easy it is for me to embrace the nobility, love of land and the rights of people, peace and loyalty of the Native American spirit. I see the same qualities in those who have chosen to serve today and feel that they, too, are our leaders for tomorrow.

10. Judy Larson American Horse   $650.00

American Horse, Oglala Sioux chief, is a study of adaptability. Although born on the Northern Plains, he became an American citizen when he was 67 years old. He fought brave battles for his people, but when he was 27 years old, lead the battle for his people in peace. He had five wives, including the daughter of war chief Red Cloud, but when only one living wife remained, joined the Episcopal church. He rode beside great chiefs in battle, including Red Cloud and He Dog, then rode briefly in Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. He fought against the invaders of his land, then traveled to Washington, rode down Pennsylvania Avenue and took part in treaty delegations. He lived free on the land he loved, then spent half his life on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

As I was researching American Horse, I found, once again, how easy it is for me to embrace the nobility, love of land and the rights of people, peace and loyalty of the Native American spirit. I see the same qualities in those who have chosen to serve today and feel that they, too, are our leaders for tomorrow.

11. Judy Larson Elk Dog Tipi   $395.00

Artist Judy Larson’s newest fine art edition revisits one of her cherished inspirations, Native American storytelling and legend. Like her previous release Crow Tipi, The Elk Dog Tipi is from a Blackfoot story, this time the legend of how horses came to be known to man. It was a powerful legend since acquiring horses drastically altered the Native American way of life.

Water Spirit's Gift of Horses

A poor, orphan boy, trying to find his way in the world, embarked on a vision journey. Traveling far from his tribe without success, the boy sat down to weep beside a large lake. Hearing the boy in his distress, a powerful Water Spirit, who lived in the lake, sent his young son to tell the boy that he wished to see him. Water Spirit's son cautioned the boy to close his eyes, hold on to his shoulders, and not to look as they started into the water. As they progressed deeper and deeper into the lake, Water Spirit's son told the boy that his father would offer him his choice of all the animals that lived in the lake. Be sure to choose the oldest mallard of the ducks and all its young ones, instructed Water Spirit's son.

At last the son and the boy reached the underwater lodge of the Water Spirit, and the boy was told to open his eyes. The Water Spirit, an old man with long white hair, welcomed the boy and asked him why he was so sad. As the boy explained his plight, Water Spirit offered his help, telling the boy that all the animals in the lake were his to give, and the boy should choose which one he wanted. Remembering the son's advice, the boy asked for the old mallard, but the Water Spirit just shook his head and said, Don't take that one, for it is old and of no value. Nevertheless, four times the boy insisted, and at last, the Water Spirit smiled and told the young boy that he had chosen wisely. The son then took the boy to the edge of the lake, and after night fell, the son caught the old mallard with a rope that he had braided from marsh grass. Placing the rope in the boy's hand, the son instructed the boy to walk on, but not to look back until sunrise.

As the boy traveled toward his camp in the darkness, he heard the flapping of the duck's wings behind him, but he did not look back. As he continued on, the flapping changed into heavy feet pounding on the ground, and the braided marsh grass rope began to turn into a rawhide rope. At sunrise, the boy looked back and beheld a large animal at the end of his rope, a horse. He mounted the horse, using the rope as a bridle. Many other horses joined his horse, and as the boy came into camp, the people were afraid, for they had never seen horses before. The boy dismounted, calmed his people's fears, and gave everyone horses and kept many for himself.

The boy gave the horse its Blackfoot name of elk dog, for it was large like an elk, but could serve the people, like a dog. He taught the people how to break and ride the horses, how to use them for packing, how to hunt buffalo from their backs, how to make bridles, hackamores and saddles, and how to use the horses to cross streams. When the boy grew older, the people made him a chief and honored him all of his days, for he was wise and generous.

12. Judy Larson Flight   $625.00

“Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” as “inalienable rights” is a concept that could only be born in a place where the land was abundant and its bounty teeming. Nothing is more American than wild horses ranging the West and wolf packs prowling the forested wilderness. Yet, these symbols of all that is wild and free are not only as threatened today as they have ever been, but are being rounded up and disposed of in a fashion they have never before had to fear: from the air.

In Judy Larson’s Flight, a herd of wild horses races away from the droning aircraft circling above. This method of rounding-up mustangs such as these is part of the program to further cull the 33,000 horses still living in the wild in 10 Western states. Another 30,000 are already in captivity. The Bureau of Land Management wants to cut this total number of horses by half!

Judy has hidden within this herd another who has even more to fear from above, an Alaskan wild wolf. Exploiting a loophole for “predator control” in the Federal Airborne Hunting Act of 1972, Alaskan hunters have found a way around the Congressionally-banned practice of hunting animals like the wolf from the air. Many hunters consider the practice, at a minimum, unsportsmanlike, since it violates the fair chase ethic of hunting. More significantly, they consider it inhumane since airborne gunmen rarely get a clean (i.e., relatively painless) kill.

13. Judy Larson Brothers and Sisters   $650.00

The pairing of an alpha male and alpha female represent a wolf pack’s genesis, but it truly becomes a pack as the offspring arrive and grow. Judy Larson first introduced us to the Elsinore Clan in 2007 with The Alphas. Nearly two years later we meet the next generation with Brothers and Sisters.

The core population of most packs is comprised of the alphas’ offspring. This bond of blood is one the prime sources of the affection and mutual aid upon which these groups are so dependent. From birth, these brothers and sisters will compete for social standing with in the clan and assume roles and responsibilities uniquely theirs. The disappearance of a wolf from a pack such as Elsinore will leave a hole not easily and quickly filled.

Such is the case here with Brothers and Sisters. We can immediately see three of the Elsinore Clan offspring lurking among the aspens. Close examination will reveal Judy has concealed a fourth, though this member of the pack remains only in spirit. She is no longer with the pack, but the memory of her place and role within it still lingers.

Judy Larson stands alone in skill and storytelling mastery of her chosen medium: scratchboard. No medium demands more planning and precision in execution, yet her subjects are alive with a freedom of form that redefines those limitations. That skill combined with a passion for the wilderness and all things wild makes owning a Larson an essential part of any art collection.

14. Judy Larson Slow Bull   $595.00

Slow Bull was a respected Oglala Sioux subchief who joined his first war party at the age of fourteen. At the age of seventeen he captured one hundred and seventy horses from the Apsaroke. That same year he received medicine from buffalo in a dream as he slept on a hilltopnot fasting or meditating, but resting from hard travel on the warpath. Over the course of his storied lifetime he engaged in fifty-five battles with rival tribes and his distinctive features can be seen in the shoulder of Judy Larson’s bull buffalo.
“I personally ‘met’ this bull buffalo in the middle of a thunderstorm, roaming wild with three hundred other buffalo on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Montana. Some of the oldest buffalo were nearing thirty-five years of age and most of the old bulls stayed by themselves, but this seasoned veteran had come to join the herd as rutting season began. He was massive and awesome.”

15. Judy Larson Ebenezer and the War Horse   $695.00

“Out of the millions of horses that have shared our country's history, only a few have distinguished themselves enough for their names to be remembered. Among these select few is Ebenezer, Chief Joseph's renowned Appaloosa racehorse. Red roan in color, with large blood-red spots on his white rump, he was not the prettiest horse in the herd, but he could run like the wind. So famous was he that newspapers in Walla Walla and Lewiston, Washington recorded each time Chief Joseph rode him into town. Everyone with a good, fast horse of his own, whether frontiersman or Native American, dreamed of the day when his horse would beat Chief Joseph's Ebenezer. But, alas! Ebenezer won all his races well out in front of the best horses in the region.

The black horse portrayed in Ebenezer and the War Horse honors another of Chief Joseph's horses. Although his name has not survived through time, he was special, as well, for he was the horse that Chief Joseph chose to ride to surrender.”

16. Judy Larson Ebenezer and the War Horse Limited Edition   $225.00

“Out of the millions of horses that have shared our country's history, only a few have distinguished themselves enough for their names to be remembered. Among these select few is Ebenezer, Chief Joseph's renowned Appaloosa racehorse. Red roan in color, with large blood-red spots on his white rump, he was not the prettiest horse in the herd, but he could run like the wind. So famous was he that newspapers in Walla Walla and Lewiston, Washington recorded each time Chief Joseph rode him into town. Everyone with a good, fast horse of his own, whether frontiersman or Native American, dreamed of the day when his horse would beat Chief Joseph's Ebenezer. But, alas! Ebenezer won all his races well out in front of the best horses in the region.

The black horse portrayed in Ebenezer and the War Horse honors another of Chief Joseph's horses. Although his name has not survived through time, he was special, as well, for he was the horse that Chief Joseph chose to ride to surrender.”

17. Judy Larson ONE WITH   $595.00

Iyuptala: Ee-yoo-P’TAH-lah. The Native American’s relationship with the elements, the earth and its inhabitants were viewed as one with. He moved through nature as he did with his animals, not as an owner or as a subduer, but as an equal, a companion, a brother. Total trust existed between the Native American and his horse, with whom he was one with. They moved together as one. They understood each other. They listened to each other. So powerful was this understanding, this respect, that the very rocks in One With speak of this relationship. Nature, the animal, and the Native American are as one unit. There is no question. The Native American and his horse belonged here, one with each other, with their Creator, and with His creation


These are the words of artist Judy Larson whose eloquence is clearly not limited to her art. Judy's passion has earned her the standing as one of America's leading artists. Her technique, the painstakingly detailed process of scratchboard, lends itself wonderfully to her art.

18. Judy Larson The Alphas   $650.00

Truly a family unit, a wolf pack is almost always composed of an alpha male, his alpha female mate and their offspring. During mating season, both the alpha male and female will fight to prevent others from breeding with their partner. Their monogamous relationship prevails until death, illness or injury prevents them from mating, or until one is ostracized from the pack. Courtship between the pair is playful, affectionate and devoted. After the annual mating, the alpha female will select a suitable site for her den near water, which the nursing mother will need. She prefers a wooded area to aid concealment, and the same location may be used throughout her breeding life, and perhaps, by successive alpha females within the same pack. Preparations on the den begin about six weeks after conception, three weeks before her pups are born. And so, the cycle of life endures, through the alliance, friendship, bond and cooperation of The Alphas.

19. Judy Larson The Crow Tipi   $395.00

When artist Judy Larson came across the Blackfeet Indian legend of The Crow Tipi, she was enthralled with the various elements of the story and how they might come together in a painting. In the legend, there was a brave warrior who stole horses and guns for his tribe.The head chief of the tribe became jealous of the warrior’s success and glory and used witchcraft to bring bad luck to the man. Three times the brave man rode out to battle, and three times he returned on foot, because his horses had run away.

As the warrior lay sleeping after returning home from a raid, he dreamt that a man came to him and said,“You should not have had to walk home alone these nights. I see you have given a share of the meat from a buffalo you killed to my children, the crows. For your kindness I will give you two things: the power to become a chief of your tribe and my own specially painted tipi, The Crow Tipi. Go a little way from here, and you will find horses. ”The warrior became chief of the Buffalo Dung band and the Crow Tipi remains in his tribe to this day.

20. Judy Larson The Gift   $545.00

Loyalty is a passion, a belief, a gift bestowed only upon those who earn it. Few leaders fired the vehemence of loyalty greater than Tatanka Iyotake, the Lakota Chief Sitting Bull.To The People, loyalty was not only a characteristic of man, but also extended to the natural and animal world. In his final years, Sitting Bull proudly rode Circus Horse, a gift from Wild West impresario Wild Bill. Some scoffed at the horse, trained to act and dance in the renowned traveling show but, with the talent of any great leader, Sitting Bull recognized in Circus Horse the fire of a true noble spirit. This was the late 1800s, the time of the Ghost Dance, a ceremony to rid the land of white people and restore the Indians’ way of life.The American government feared that Sitting Bull would join the movement and bring the Lakota with him. Indian police were sent to arrest him, and a battle quickly ensued. At the sound of bullets, Circus Horse began the act he had been trained to do: a dance of pawing the ground and throwing his mane.To the Lakota it was far more. Circus Horse’s great white body remained at Sitting Bull’s side throughout the battle and, after the Chief was struck down, danced for hours more in respect for the fallen man. It is said that Circus Horse was possessed with a spirit, for throughout the entire battle, this imposing target was not struck by a single bullet. Discover the face of loyalty in Judy Larson’s The Gift.

21. Judy Larson The Ghost Wind   $695.00

The first offering in The Noble Spirit Series

It has been said that in the early mists of dawn they were invisible; in a snowstorm, undetectable; in battle, unseen. Then, like the spirits for which they were named, they inexplicably appeared.
Ghost Wind horses carried big medicine. Along with their stealth, they were exceptionally intelligent. They were trained to be fierce combatants, but, like warrior-poets, they were also renowned for their complacent and docile nature. Their value to the tribe was known to be greater than that of any human.

Distinguishing each Ghost Wind were two to four, or a handful of dark spots, but only on its left side. Lightening or vanishing stripes graced the cheekbones of the face. The skin of the body was silver white, the hair more like fur, and dark stockings covered the legs. The direct father/son breeding line traced back to the Northwest's Siletz and Talimook peoples, who bred their horses with Russian (as opposed to Spanish) spotted horses. Quite rare, they did not appear in every generation.

Considered to be forever wild, a Ghost Wind was never owned, but simply watched over by a caretaker or custodian. Still, its training was intense. It could be counted on to continue an attack against a foe, even after its rider had fallen. Yet, directly after battle this forceful warrior would be placed in the care of an eight, or nine, or ten-year-old child. Such was the training and nature of this remarkable horse that, returning directly from the violence of warfare, a small child could handle it. A noble spirit, indeed.



The Noble Spirit Series

Concealed imagery has long been a hallmark of a Judy Larson composition, a second part to the story she tells in any painting. With The Ghost Wind, however, both the portrayal, as well as the story, begin and end with the beauty of, and the passion for, the unique horse itself. The Noble Spirit Series will interpret the nature of legendary North American animals without the aid of concealed imagery.

22. Judy Larson The Ghost Wind Limited Edition   $245.00

The first offering in The Noble Spirit Series

It has been said that in the early mists of dawn they were invisible; in a snowstorm, undetectable; in battle, unseen. Then, like the spirits for which they were named, they inexplicably appeared.
Ghost Wind horses carried big medicine. Along with their stealth, they were exceptionally intelligent. They were trained to be fierce combatants, but, like warrior-poets, they were also renowned for their complacent and docile nature. Their value to the tribe was known to be greater than that of any human.

Distinguishing each Ghost Wind were two to four, or a handful of dark spots, but only on its left side. Lightening or vanishing stripes graced the cheekbones of the face. The skin of the body was silver white, the hair more like fur, and dark stockings covered the legs. The direct father/son breeding line traced back to the Northwest's Siletz and Talimook peoples, who bred their horses with Russian (as opposed to Spanish) spotted horses. Quite rare, they did not appear in every generation.

Considered to be forever wild, a Ghost Wind was never owned, but simply watched over by a caretaker or custodian. Still, its training was intense. It could be counted on to continue an attack against a foe, even after its rider had fallen. Yet, directly after battle this forceful warrior would be placed in the care of an eight, or nine, or ten-year-old child. Such was the training and nature of this remarkable horse that, returning directly from the violence of warfare, a small child could handle it. A noble spirit, indeed.



The Noble Spirit Series

Concealed imagery has long been a hallmark of a Judy Larson composition, a second part to the story she tells in any painting. With The Ghost Wind, however, both the portrayal, as well as the story, begin and end with the beauty of, and the passion for, the unique horse itself. The Noble Spirit Series will interpret the nature of legendary North American animals without the aid of concealed imagery.

23. Judy Larson THE PROTESTERS Limited Edition   $245.00

Lofty, elegantly formed, active and durable; described explorer Meriwether Lewis in 1806, in short, many of them look like fine English coursers. The spotted horses of the Nez PercT were unlike any he and William Clark had ever seen. Named by the Nez PercT after the Palouse River, these wildly colored horses were believed to be gifts from the gods.


In 1877, the Nez PercT entered a war with the U.S. government, and the entire tribe with its several thousand carefully bred horses, embarked on a journey that would take them 1,300 miles toward the safe haven of Canada. Only forty miles from the border, the Nez PercT were besieged and outnumbered by the U.S. cavalry. Forced to surrender, Chief Joseph and his captured people were taken far from their homeland. Their exceptional horses, which Chief Joseph referred to as my children, were deliberately killed by the U.S. cavalry in attempt to thwart any further escape by the Nez PercT, and also to crush the spirit of the Nez PercT by killing their animal companions. The U.S. Government sought to annihilate the tribal horses much as they sought to destroy the buffalo.Only a few horses were lost in the mountains, sold in the east, or hidden away by ranchers. By the beginning of the 20th century, fewer than 300 Appaloosa horses remained.


The Protesters portrays three prized Nez PercT horses, running for their very lives, in an attempt to evade the three U.S. cavalry soldiers (hidden in their coats) bent on their destruction. These horses represent the spirit of the Nez PercT, which continues to survive against all odds.

Look CloserThe time consuming art of scratchboard is unrivaled in its detail, allowing Judy's seemless concealment of imagery within her subject. To view the extraordinary hidden images within Judy's work, click here.


24. Judy Larson The Misfits Limited Edition   $245.00

The Misfits is the sixth and final offering in Judy Larson’s On the Run series, which focuses on animals in dire circumstances. “Perhaps by revisiting a few of these incidents in our country’s history, we will not be destined to repeat the events of the past, but will seek to value our wildlife,” says Larson.
“The Misfits refers specifically to tragic fate of the many thousands of wild horses in Central and Southern California that once roamed the state where I live,” Larson says. “Several times a year, I travel through the Central Valley of California, where crops are now grown and cattle and sheep graze. Since reading of the thousands of horses that ran free upon that land, I find that I cannot pass through without imagining what a sight they would have made and what an appalling tragedy it was to lose them all in violence. I’d like the viewer to engage with the eyes of The Misfits horses and to remember that there are still wild horses on public lands today that love their lives and freedom every bit as much as those wild horses of yesteryear. The horses in The Misfits represent a few of the survivors, as well as some of the ancestors, of the wild horses of today.”

25. Judy Larson FIRE and FLIGHT Limited Edition   $245.00

To live in harmony with the forces of nature is the essence of being wild. The untamed mustang embodies unbound freedom honed by the raucous ebb and flow of Mother Nature. Instincts, unfettered by the influence of man and acquired over generations, guide, like guardian spirits, the horses coexistence with the elements. This mustang, bathed in amber by the light of an encroaching prairie fire, makes for safety just beyond the edges of the temporary destructions. Soon, renewal will spring from the ashes, but there is something more to these forces of nature.

26. Judy Larson AIR AND ESCAPE   $650.00

As air, particularly in the form of wind, can spook even a savvy horse more than any other element. The wind provides protection to the wild horse, carrying smells of danger, and giving it time to escape to safety. The white buffalo also depends on this same protective power which the air provides. In the world of the Plains Indians, the white buffalo was revered and especially sacred. Deemed the most acceptable gift that could be obtained to offer to the Great Spirit, this rarest specimen of all buffalo, when encountered, was always killed for sacrifice. Ceremony and ritual accompanied the taking of a white buffalo. Although different tribes used the skin in various ways, all of them prized the white buffalo for its powerful spirituality. Today, when a white buffalo calf is born, it is visited by Native Americans and acknowledged as a symbol of the return to the old ways. It is a sign of answered prayers and that people are coming back to religion and spirituality.

27. Judy Larson FIRE and FLIGHT   $650.00

To live in harmony with the forces of nature is the essence of being wild. The untamed mustang embodies unbound freedom honed by the raucous ebb and flow of Mother Nature. Instincts, unfettered by the influence of man and acquired over generations, guide, like guardian spirits, the horses coexistence with the elements. This mustang, bathed in amber by the light of an encroaching prairie fire, makes for safety just beyond the edges of the temporary destructions. Soon, renewal will spring from the ashes, but there is something more to these forces of nature.

28. Judy Larson THE RESISTERS   $650.00

In 1919, the United States Department of Interior ordered the Crow Indians to kill all wild horses on their reservation land, sacred ground that had been leased by the government to cattlemen. No Crow could abide by this order, a demand akin to In 1923, following a final ultimatum, theasking a man to kill his own brother. United States government hired local cowboys, joined later by Texas outfitters, to kill the horses on a bounty basisCfour dollars for the tip of a horses During the next seven years, the hired guns killed more than 40,000 horses, ear. including the Crows personal mounts.

By 1930, the great and powerful Crow tribe was bereft of its horses, its culture severely damaged. To the Crow, whose livelihood depended on their prized horses, this tragic event was more devastating than a military defeat.

29. Judy Larson THE SURVIVORS Limited Edition   $245.00

Judy Larson’s newest work conveys an inspiring message of hope and renewal. Few people know, she explains, that by 1902, the last wild herd of bison numbered only 23 animals. Native Americans had been deprived of a deep spiritual connection with the bison, on whom their culture depended. I am gratified to know that concerted efforts are being made to reintroduce bison on tribal lands. Judy’s art takes us back to Yellowstone in 1902. We see life renewed in the bison calf and the land bringing forth new growth after a fire. Published from the artist’s original scratchboard painting.

30. Judy Larson KINSHIP   $650.00

the word reveals several meanings, Larson tells us. Concealed in the female wolf's coat (left of her shoulder), you'll find the face of a Native American woman; on the male wolf's neck, a man. the flank of the female wolf bears a Native American man's face to represent the rest of the tribe. Larson adds, I've grouped the wolves closely to emphasize the necessity of tribal and pack members - male and female - to work together to ensure survival.

31. Judy Larson KINSHIP Limited Edition   $245.00

the word reveals several meanings, Larson tells us. Concealed in the female wolf's coat (left of her shoulder), you'll find the face of a Native American woman; on the male wolf's neck, a man. the flank of the female wolf bears a Native American man's face to represent the rest of the tribe. Larson adds, I've grouped the wolves closely to emphasize the necessity of tribal and pack members - male and female - to work together to ensure survival.

32. Judy Larson HE DOG Limited Edition   $245.00

He Dog. Childhood friend of Crazy Horse, witness to his murder.

Born in the same year, in the same season, He Dog and Crazy Horse grew up together in the same Ogala band, played together, courted girls together, fought together. Distinguishing themselves in both war and peace, they were made chiefs, “shirt weavers” and hence bearers of the Crow Owner’s Society. He Dog, at age 92 in 1930, gave his personal account of the killing of Crazy Horse by a soldier at Fort Robinson in 1877. He Dog was at his side, a friend to the last.

The magnificent stallion featured in He Dog pays homage not only to the “sacred dog,” the horse, of the Plains Indians, but also to the noble life of a great Dakota.

33. Judy Larson A TIME TO HEAL   $245.00

The old, traditional ways of wolfing had seriously reduced wolf populations, even more barbaric forms of annihilating wolves were instituted. The “loop” refers not to a device designed to ensnare adult wolves but to trap and hand up living pups while the adult pack was away from the den in the nighttime hunt. Made of wire and spring-loaded hooks, the long trap offered tempting bits of meat to the unsuspecting pups. As they were caught, the strangling youngsters struggled and cried out in pain and panic, but their mother could do nothing but lick them and try to comfort them. When the pack members returned a dawn, each was gunned down until all the adults had been killed. Only then did the wolfer step in to kill the pups as well, effectively wiping out an entire family. An ancient Indian story says that the spirits of all the slaughtered wolves of this vast land have gathered at a distant mountaintop, awaiting the time when they can safely return to roam the land they love. For much of our country this time has not come, but hope remains that what has happened over the last few years on the tribal lands of the Nez Perce can one day occur throughout our great land. The Nez Perce have long been admired for their skill in horsemanship and their ability to breed exception horses, known today as Appaloosas. These spotted horses were not only born with good “medicine” that would keep their owners safe in battle, but they were also sure-footed, strong, healthy and easy to train. In 1805, as Meriwether Lewis and William Clark passed through the Nez Perce territory, the beauty and uniqueness of the spotted horses amazed them. In an effort to destroy the spirit of the Nez Perce, the government had hit upon one of the most potent means possible: the killing of the People’s beloved horses. By 1900, fewer than three hundred Appaloosa horses remained in the United States. For the Nez Perce, the Appaloosa and the wolf, the government’s penchant for control of people and nature came close to forcing their extinction. But a few years ago, the Nez Perce ushered in a time of healing —one which offers potential for changing our ideas and ourselves — by welcoming to its tribal lands in Winchester, Idaho, a pack of wolves raised in captivity, formerly known as “The Sawtooth Pack.” The famous pack, first introduced to the public in the documentary "Wolves at Our Door," is at home again on the land that its ancestors once shared with the native people. This time, however, the eleven “Wolves of the Nez Perce” play different roles: as ambassadors for their wild brothers and sisters. The mission of the accompanying Wolf Education and Research Center is to promote awareness of wolves and to learn through education for the purpose of co-existing with them. Visitors are provided with a rare opportunity to experience the wonder of wolves in a natural setting and to partner in this mission with the Nez Perce, a native people rich in culture, history and ecological understanding. Now, more than ever, it is a time to heal.

34. Judy Larson AND THEN THERE WERE NONE   $235.00

Now unattended, but bonded forever by their heritage, a small band of Indian horses find company and solace in each other. Although unspoken, their groupings pay homage to kinder days and to the one who once possessed them, the last of his tribe.

35. Judy Larson MEDICINE CROW   $245.00

"While reading the works of the early 20th century photo-historian Edward S. Curtis, I came across a description of a Mountain Crow warrior named Medicine Crow. In many ways, Medicine Crow was typical of the Native American of his day — steadfast and loyal to his people, a contributor to his tribe. His ‘medicine’ (an object thought to give control over natural or magical forces) was a hawk, which he wore as part of his headdress. In battle it was more important for him to touch his enemy — count coup — than to kill him. Medicine Crow fought for the white man twice, against the Nez Perce in Chief Joseph’s retreat and against the Sioux under Sitting Bull when they were seeking sanctuary in Canada. I feel it’s important for us to remember and to acknowledge Native Americans like Medicine Crow and to learn about the kind of people upon whom our nation is founded."

36. Judy Larson NINE TO FIVE   $235.00

Five Indian ponies sense an inexplicable presence. As they make their way through the rocks and trees down the steep hillside, their uneasiness is conveyed to their riders. Warily, the party pauses. By happenstance, these five Native Americans have chanced upon a place so filled with the spirit of the wolf that even the rocks and trees attest to their power. After today, the five riders’ medicine will be stronger and more powerful, having been blessed by nine natural benefactors.

37. Judy Larson PACKHERD   $245.00

Packs and herds. These encompassing words denote harmony and strength. But although the wolf pack and the horse herd are among the most social of all animal societies, harmony in the pack and the herd does not mean that all members have equal rights. Each group has a definitive pecking order with a clear position and role for each member.

38. Judy Larson PRYOR COMMITMENT   $245.00

Tourist brochures paint a picture of Pryor Mountain region almost too lovely for words. And, indeed, this wild horse country, on the border of Montana and Wyoming is both a spectacular and a challenging land. Crow and Shoshone once rode though this area on their way to hunt buffalo on the Plains. Here, on the south slope of East Pryor Mountain overlooking the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, lies the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, encompassing almost 47,000 acres devoted to the nation’s first wild horse refuge. Unique, wild mustangs of Spanish ancestry have occupied the many ridges and ravines of this rugged and mysterious country for, some say, close to a hundred years. Approximately 120 to 140 of these rare mustangs roam free, from the Pryor’s high meadows down to the juniper-covered foothills, from the desert-like badlands to the valley floor’s green fields. Mustangs, mule deer, elk, black bear and bighorn sheep all share the delights and hazards of living in this harsh and secluded environment. The Pryor Mountain mustangs are generally referred to as primitive-type horses. All as small, standing twelve to fourteen hands and some have the coats of dun and grulla generally regarded as the color of the primitive-type breed. Only the dun and grulla mustangs and occasionally a bay or chestnut are characterized by primitive markings - dorsal, zebra and with stripes, dark-rimmed ears and other unique markings. The Pryor Mountain mustangs, so characteristic of Spanish colonial horses, also possess a sloping croup, long tapering muscles, a deep body and convex head with fine crescent-shaped nostrils. Genetically unique, Pryor Mountain horses are historically and culturally important, worthy of preservation. Mustangs are not vanishing but the territory allotted to support them is. Remarkably fecund, mustangs simply do not have enough land to support their growing numbers. Despite inclement weather, poor roughage and semi-desert terrain, each year’s new foal crop can increase a herd up to twenty percent. To keep the numbers in check, twenty to forty animals are separated from the Pryor Mountain herd each March at the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Britton Springs Corral.

39. Judy Larson RED HORSE   $245.00

In 1876, at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Custer’s troops were badly outnumbered, although just how many Indians fought that day has always been a matter of debate. But by any account it was a tremendous gathering of mostly Sioux (as the Lakota were called) and Cheyenne Indians that were sprawled for several miles along the western bank of the Little Bighorn River, poised to meet Long Hair’s army. Custer had decided to have each of the companies in his 7th Cavalry ride a designated color of horse. Since his troop commanders were allowed, according to their rank to select the color they preferred, some officer favored the scheme more than others. E Troop, whose soldiers fell low on the totem pole, ended up with the least desirable but visually striking grays. Red Horse, a Minneconjou Lakota and a chief, was with his band in the center of the encampment. He was not involved in the battle until Custer approached from the opposite direction wherein Red Horse and other warriors crossed the river to do battle. As the fighting intensified on the eastern side of the river, the 213 men of E Troop desperately tried to hold the ridge against the Indian advance. With the fierce battle reduced to hand-to-hand combat, the cavalrymen were unable to shoot and hold their horses at the same time. The last of the gray horses were released, some shot, some captured. Red Horse was not only a participant but a verbal and visual witness. His forty-one color pictographs — called ledger drawings — depicting all phases of action are on display at the Smithsonian Institution. "Of course, I could not resist the intriguing coincidence of the gray horses of Troop E involved in battle with an Indian named Red Horse. This offered me the perfect opportunity to use camouflage to arouse the curiosity of the viewer and encourage him to step away from the painting. At first glance what one sees is a painting of a gray horse called Red Horse. I hoped that people would look more closely, wondering what the title meant to convey."