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1. Bob Coronato Gold Rush Days Limited Edition Print   $395.00

Gold Rush Days is a passionate recreation of the iconic western rodeo poster. Using his skills as an intaglio print maker and painter, Bob combined drawing and silkscreen with layers of oil and acrylic glazes to get that aged effect he was seeking. Having spent years as a real cowboy in Wyoming, Coronato’s sense of western authenticity is impeccable. Gold Rush Days is made available as both a giclée on paper and giclée canvas, each capturing the different moods Coronato set out to create. The paper edition feels as if it is an antique poster created 100 years ago. The canvas edition could be an original painting that at one time hung in a frontier saloon lacking only the embedded scent of decades old cigars. 

2. Bob Coronato Gold Rush Days Masterwork Canvas Edition   $795.00

Gold Rush Days is a passionate recreation of the iconic western rodeo poster. Using his skills as an intaglio print maker and painter, Bob combined drawing and silkscreen with layers of oil and acrylic glazes to get that aged effect he was seeking. Having spent years as a real cowboy in Wyoming, Coronato’s sense of western authenticity is impeccable. Gold Rush Days is made available as both a giclée on paper and giclée canvas, each capturing the different moods Coronato set out to create. The paper edition feels as if it is an antique poster created 100 years ago. The canvas edition could be an original painting that at one time hung in a frontier saloon lacking only the embedded scent of decades old cigars. 

3. Bob Coronato Head Five Miles That Way Then Go Five Miles That Way...smallwork Canvas Edition   $225.00

Head five miles that way,...and then go five miles that way,... ’bring back every critter ya find ! by Bob Coronato I was part of a brand crew in North East Wyoming and South East Montana around the turn of this century. We were gathering 10,000 acres at a time, on a ranch that covered several counties, and two states. As we headed out that morning towards the Montana bad lands, the boss told us to head out five miles that way,... etc. I was wondering how we were supposed to know when we reached five miles? After all, my roots are back east where 100 acres is a big farm. Nevertheless we gathered up everything we found and headed them back to the portable corals set up near the camp. We had a chuck wagon, ranch bedroll wagon, a remuda of horses and we slept in wall tents on the prairie. We moved camp about every other day, covering 20 some miles between camps. As I recall we branded 300 cows a day for about two weeks.

4. Bob Coronato Head five miles that way then go five miles that SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

Head five miles that way,and then go five miles that way,
’bring back every critter ya find !
by Bob Coronato

“I was part of a brand crew in North East Wyoming and South East Montana around the turn of this century. We were gathering 10,000 acres at a time, on a ranch that covered several counties, and two states. As we headed out that morning towards the Montana bad lands, the boss told us to head out five miles that way, etc. I was wondering how we were supposed to know when we reached five miles? After all, my roots are back east where 100 acres is a big farm.

“Nevertheless we gathered up everything we found and headed them back to the portable corals set up near the camp. We had a chuck wagon, ranch bedroll wagon, a remuda of horses and we slept in wall tents on the prairie. We moved camp about every other day, covering 20 some miles between camps. As I recall we branded 300 cows a day for about two weeks.

“The country we were working was so rough, yet beautiful and vast. It really impressed me as to the scale of the workplace where we were going to spend the days ahead, gathering the cow calves for branding. From Ridge Montana (population about 15) up to Rocky Point and Lightning Flats, I have the greatest memories, of some of the roughest countryside. The West really lives on in this small hideout of our country.”

5. Bob Coronato Gold Rush Days Limited Edition   $395.00

Gold Rush Days is a passionate recreation of the iconic western rodeo poster. Using his skills as an intaglio print maker and painter, Bob combined drawing and silkscreen with layers of oil and acrylic glazes to get that aged effect he was seeking. Having spent years as a real cowboy in Wyoming, Coronato’s sense of western authenticity is impeccable.

Gold Rush Days is made available as both a giclTe on paper and giclTe canvas, each capturing the different moods Coronato set out to create. The paper edition feels as if it is an antique poster created 100 years ago. The canvas edition could be an original painting that at one time hung in a frontier saloon lacking only the embedded scent of decades old cigars.

6. Bob Coronato Nothn like the Feeln of Riden a Fine Horse MUSEUM EDITION ON   $2450.00

“It’s already October, and a long dry summer is coming to an end with cool wind blowing over the powdered ground. On this day I get up at three a.m. and load up the outfit (truck) with my saddle, chinks, spurs and my trusty Carhartt jacket. I head out on the frosty morning down a dark, lonely road past Devil’s Tower. I leave Hulett, population 429, to head to an even more remote section of Wyoming. I can hardly keep my eyes open as I drive over the endless dirt roads, listening to Neil Young. As the song sets the mood in the darkness I can almost feel a sense of nostalgia for what I’m doing and where I’m going. It seems in just a few years this day may just be a story and a memory because this part of the country is changing fast.

To read this complete story, click here


7. Bob Coronato Today we will look our best And you will take me where I want to go Tomorrow they will te   $850.00

When Spanish explorers came to the land that would become America, they brought horses with them clad in armored masks. Native Americans soon adapted the mask for their own horses, influenced by visions and decorated motifs of hail, thunder and lightning. The armor adorned with these symbols of power could transform the horse and rider into great warriors with extraordinary abilities and possibly even carry them into the space between this world and the next, where bullets and arrows could not hurt them.

To this day, Plains Indians decorate their horses for ceremony and adorn them with images of power. Bob Coronato was inspired to paint this piece while watching relay races at Crow Fair. He realized, he says, how much the horse culture is very much the same today as it was in the past.

8. Bob Coronato No PlaceFor Amateurs! MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $1250.00

“In the northeast corner of Wyoming on the Montana border, the ranches are big, the grass is plentiful and the country is rough,” says artist Bob Coronato of No Place à For Amateurs! “With few people for hundreds of miles, this is perfect cowboy country for the tough, spirited, pioneer types who call it home. A few years ago, I was on a brand crew traveling with a chuck wagon, a rumuda of horses and bed roll wagon. Gathering 10,000 acre pastures and branding about 300 cows a day for about 12 days straight, we woke before dawn and worked until dark, moving camp each time we finished gathering all the stock within a days ride. With the Montana Badlands in the distance, we were working the open country, gathering the livestock for branding and building temporary corrals. Weather describes the high plains best: In the morning you had on winter coats, long johns and silk scarves to wrap your neck from the wind, by the end of the day, it usually rained or snowed at least once and then by late afternoon it was hot enough for short sleeves. Only the toughest spirit enjoys this climate and the cowboys I was working with not only thrived in it, but were some of the best hands I’d ever had the privilege to work with.
Over the two week stretch there were a few bad wrecks and the usual close calls. One guy got bucked off and broke his arm. I drove him 100 miles to the Cowboy Back Bar for a shot before going down the road to the hospital. On the way back to camp, we stopped at the Stoneville Saloon (“Cheap Drinks and Lousy Food” reads the sign outside). By the next day he figured he healed up enough to get back to work and by afternoon he was roping calves on horseback in his cast.
I use times like those days on the brand crew, to add the grit and character to my art, that only living the life can inspire. Into the second week, I was working with Mark, who we all knew as “Gootz”, roping and dragging calves when, for a split second, I saw the image I knew I had to paint. A vision that perfectly captured the spirit and freedom of the cowboys who work the high plains rough countryùa place they call home.”

9. Bob Coronato June 9th in the Black Hills P'ard all I remembert'   $795.00

June 9th in the Black Hills
P'ard all I remember, 'twas a cold som-bitch
by Bob Coronato

This was a day I'd been waiting for since I was a kid, says cowboy artist Bob Coronato about his latest release. Coronato relates the genesis for this piece, based on his experience working on a ranch on the border of South Dakota and Wyoming. I was there to help the Foreman, a colorful, tough old man of few words, move cows to their summer pasture. We got up at 4:30 a.m. and my friend George suggested I wear my heavy winter gear. Since it was 75 degrees the day before, I thought he was pulling a prank. I decided not to take a chance and brought the gear. I saddled up my horse, which was bucking and kicking to shake out the cold.

Hoping to get a good view of the thousands of cows snaking up the limestone canyon, I went to the front and took a small bunch ahead to point the rest of the herd. The temperature dropped as we got higher into the mountains and the rain turned to large wet flakes covering the canyon walls. As the cows were heating up, steam started to rise off their backs until billowing clouds rose up through the canyon like a train puffing through the Black Hills. I was glad I had my slicker and wild rag around my neck as the snow turned into a blizzard. I sat tucked up under a pine tree branch listening to the flakes through the trees, hoping I'd never forget a detail of this amazing day. As the snow collected on my hat and the black dye ran down my back, I couldn't wait to paint this scene, unfolding before my eyes. With about ten inches of snow on the ground, George and I rode up the side of the herd yelling 'this is the life for me!'

10. Bob Coronato The Horse Wrangler gatherd the morn   $750.00

The Horse Wrangler Gather’d The Morning Mounts:
“One That Had’n Lived The Life Couldn’t Paint a Picture
To Please The Eye, of One That Had!”
by Bob Coronato

Like many kids, artist Bob Coronato grew up fascinated with the cowboy life. When he started to paint in earnest, he sold a painting to a man who thought he was good, but said he would be much better if he knew something about real cowboys. Upon graduating from Otis/Parsons Art School, he moved to Hulett,Wyoming (population 409) finding ranches that still “cowboy” in the old ways, realizing that the west he was searching for as a kid was still there, evidenced by Them’s a Bunch-a Bronc Stomp’nSun
Fish’nS.O.B.’s.

“I was once part of a brand crew that traveled with a 1880s chuck wagon,” Coronato says of The Horse Wrangler “Each evening, we would set the horses free to find water and grass. And each morning, before the sun came up, the horse wrangler rode out in the darkness to gather the horses from were they wandered the night before. As the ground started to shake and the wrangler drove the horses over the hill in the corral, I knew a long day was about to begin . But I couldn’t wait, it was like being part of a special history.”