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2. William Phillips Dawn The World Forever Changed, L.e.print   $1895.00

At 3 PM, on August 4, 1945, Colonel Paul Tibbets began briefing the crew of the B-29 named Enola Gay. In the early morning hours of August 5, the crew made its final preparations. At midnight there was a final briefing. The call sign decided upon was, innocuously, "Dimples." Tibbets finished his talk: "Do your jobs. Follow your orders. Don't cut corners and don't take chances." Then the weather officer passed along last-minute information and the chaplain offered a prayer. At 2:27 AM on August 6, the engines were started. At 2:45, the Enola Gay took off. She was followed by the Great Artiste, carrying scientific instruments, and No. 91, carrying Photographic equipment. At 5:30 AM, just before dawn, Enola Gay circled above Iwo Jima. At 8:15:17 AM, the bomb-bay doors opened and the first atomic bomb fell toward Hiroshima. Sixteen hours later, President Harry S. Truman once again called upon the Japanese to surrender.

3. William Phillips When Prayers are Answered ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

Thrashing away on three engines and a feathered prop, with flak damage to her wing and tail, this B-17F has survived another brutal mission over Germany―but just barely. The Betty Boop/Pistol Packin’ Mama will make it through this day. The white line on the horizon is a bomber crew’s most prayed-for-sight: the chalk cliffs of England. Now the P-47 escort, mixture leaned out & flying on fumes, can peel off and slide down toward their base.

Operating out of Framlingham, England on October 10, 1943, Betty Boop/Pistol Packin’ Mama, of the 390th Bomb Group, 570th Bomb Squadron, was one of 133 B-17s dispatched for a daylight raid on Munster to target the railroad station and yard. Takeoff went smoothly and twelve P47 fighter escorts arrived to provide top cover, until reaching the limit of the fighters’ range. At that crucial juncture, the fighters turned for England and the bombers faced unrestrained German fighters while making their runs―a concentrated and violent attack.

The sky was blackened with flak and peppered with over 200 German fighters including Fock-Wulf 190s, Junkers 88s and Messerschmitt 109s, 110s and 210s. For the 390th, eight crews and aircraft, out of their departing nineteen, were lost. The mission was grueling; the losses were brutal.

As the clouds part in this Bill Phillips’ trademark sky and rays of sunlight and hope stream down upon the chalk cliffs of England. Cold-sweat can begin to dry as another grueling mission nears its end and this B-17’s crew thanks the Lord for answering its fervent prayers.

Bill Phillips’ When Prayers are Answered is a visually stunning work of contemporary art from one of the most sought-after and collected aviation artists of our time―an exquisite piece of historic and patriotic art for your home or office.

4. William Phillips A Bandit Goes Down   $495.00

Hedgehopping sometimes gives a scared pilot the chance to shake off pursuit. Not this time. “As I closed in to fire, he must have looked back,” recollects Col. “Bud” Anderson” and inadvertently shoved forward maybe an inch on the stick. At that height and speed, an inch would have been more than enough. The Messerschmitt simply flew into the ground at full power and blew up like a bomb.”

5. William Phillips The Long Green Line ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $395.00

A flight of Bell UH-1 Iroquois “Hueys” hammer through a misty, monsoon soaked Vietnam valley. The aircraft and the distinctive sound of its Pratt and Whitney engine-powered rotor will forever be synonymous with the Vietnam War.

Bill Phillips says no veteran of the fighting there will ever forget the unique sound of a flight approaching. A faint, distant muttering would fade in and out as bends in the valleys and mountains muffled the sound. It would grow quickly to a sudden thunder rumbling between the hills, echoing the length of every glade that the helicopters darted through on their way to or from the target of the day. “Of course every Vietcong for miles around heard the Hueys, just as our troops did. They could prepare a welcome for them with small arms fire or they could clear out, “Bill reminisces.

“I had the privilege of going with the navy to the Persian Gulf as a combat artist. While flying with the Marine gunships there, I experienced a sense of déjà vu, since I had flown in armed Hueys during my term of duty in Vietnam, “says Bill.

The Long Green Line is a tribute to those who served in Vietnam and to the machines they flew.

6. William Phillips The Long Green Line ANNINVERSARY MUSEUMEDITION CAN   $895.00

A flight of Bell UH-1 Iroquois “Hueys” hammer through a misty, monsoon soaked Vietnam valley. The aircraft and the distinctive sound of its Pratt and Whitney engine-powered rotor will forever be synonymous with the Vietnam War.

Bill Phillips says no veteran of the fighting there will ever forget the unique sound of a flight approaching. A faint, distant muttering would fade in and out as bends in the valleys and mountains muffled the sound. It would grow quickly to a sudden thunder rumbling between the hills, echoing the length of every glade that the helicopters darted through on their way to or from the target of the day. “Of course every Vietcong for miles around heard the Hueys, just as our troops did. They could prepare a welcome for them with small arms fire or they could clear out, “Bill reminisces.

“I had the privilege of going with the navy to the Persian Gulf as a combat artist. While flying with the Marine gunships there, I experienced a sense of déjà vu, since I had flown in armed Hueys during my term of duty in Vietnam, “says Bill.

The Long Green Line is a tribute to those who served in Vietnam and to the machines they flew.

7. William Phillips When You See ZerosFight Em   $395.00

A warhorse needn¡¯t be pretty ¨D it earns its oats in combat. The design of Japan¡¯s elegant Mitsubishi Zero may have enabled it to out-fly the Grumman F4F Wildcat on paper. Armor, self-sealing fuel tanks, a superior ceiling and dive rate led to the development of combat tactics that made the Wildcat a dangerous opponent. And when men like Marine Corps Captain Joseph J. Foss were behind the stick, it couldn¡¯t be outfought.

William S. Phillips When You See Zeros, Fight ¡¯Em depicts October 23, 1943 in the skies over Guadalcanal, when 28 Japanese Zeros and 16 Betty bombers swarmed over the island. Foss and his men were in the skies to counter attack. At one point, a Wildcat in pursuit of a Zero became potential prey himself, pursued by another Zero. Seeing this, Foss brought his plane in behind to within a few feet of the Zero and opened fire. The Zero burst into flames and the pilot bailed out, clearing Foss' plane by inches.

Foss had a great appreciation for the Wildcat¡¯s sturdy airframe. After his first victory, he got separated from his wingman¨Doften a fatal mistake. Zeros ¡°bounced¡± him and he dove for the deck, recalling that the Japanese planes were said to shed their wings in a dive. Wrong. ¡°The wings didn¡¯t come off,¡± reported Joe, ¡°and they really salted me.¡± Well-riddled, he crash-landed his Wildcat and remembered the lesson.

Foss would claim that wasn¡¯t a good shot. ¡°I just got up there and stuck those guns up his tail. When you see Zeros,¡± he told his squadron, ¡°fight ¡®em.¡± He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his ¡°indomitable fighting spirit¡± in the skies over Guadalcanal in the fall of 1942. In just 63 days he shot down 26 planes.

When You See Zero¡¯s, Fight¡¯ Em, an Anniversary Edition Gicl¨¨e Canvas, is a gorgeous tribute to Marine Corps Ace Joseph J. Foss and the unsubduable F4F Wildcat.

8. William Phillips The Phantoms and the Wizard ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

Aviation Art as only Bill Phillips can: the staggering beauty of Crater Lake, Oregon, as seen from the cockpit of a F-4 flying in the “slot position” over Wizard Island afloat in the volcanic lake, en route to Kingsley Field for routine training. In this stunning 40 x 20 Anniversary Edition canvas, the dazzling white snow makes the blue lake water seem even bluer than usual. “Don’t try this maneuver,” he warns, “only an artist can create it and only on canvas.”

9. William Phillips The Hunter Becomes the Hunted ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $495.00

The arrival of Colonel Hub Zemke and his “Wolf Pack” P-47 Thunderbolts turns the tide and the fates of war on a Fw-190 attacking the B-17’s of the 100th Bomb group of Nazi Germany. This Phillips aviation art classic is finally available as an Anniversary Edition, and for a select few, as a very limited and very stunning, oversize MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas.

10. William Phillips The Hunter Becomes the Hunted MASTERWORK ANNIVERSARY EDITION   $995.00

Target: Berlin. It was March 6, 1944 and B-17s and B-24s of the Mighty 8th Air Forces’ 1st, 2nd and 3rd Air Divisions streamed into a ninety-four-mile wave to attack Berlin. Among the massed bombers, the 100th Bomb Group (H) manned 20 B-17s flying at 21,000 feet, 200 miles west of Berlin. There, twenty-one Fw-190s bored in with deadly accuracy, downing fifteen Flying Fortresses into the fields below. Half of the crewmembers aboard the fallen bombers perished; the rest were imprisoned.

Recklessly, one Focke-Wulf pilot, Oberleutnant Wolfgang Kretschmer, turned to attack the remaining B-17s alone and he, in turn, became the target of eight escorting P47 Thunderbolts of the 56th Fighter Group, the “Wolf Pack” led by Colonel Hub Zemke. Fighters dove and shot him down. Although injured and badly burned, Oberleutnant Kretschmer survived. It was the worst single day of air warfare for the 8th Air Force. Sixty-nine U.S. heavy bombers and eleven escort fighters were lost.

But air warfare was about the bold acts of individuals who risked their lives daily and The Hunter Becomes the Hunted conveys how quickly the fates of war can turn. This Phillips aviation art classic is finally available as an Anniversary Edition, and for a select few, as a very limited and very stunning, oversized MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas.

11. William Phillips Winter Splendor   $495.00

“The primal solitude of the place,” answers artist William S. Phillips when asked what it is he would most like to convey about the Grand Canyon. “On this particular morning, I was on the South Rim of the canyon between Yavapai and Mather Point and had hit the trail long before dawn. It was freezing, three to four degrees, with tendrils of moisture in the air and snow clinging to everything.

“As the sun rose, the northern walls of the canyon and the clouds above were illuminated with the warmest of light. It was only five minutes or so after the sun came up, so really there was no discernible change in temperature but the grandeur of the moment and the promise of a new day here in this beautiful place, warmed my soul.”

William S. Phillips’ Winter Splendor captures the inspiring and humbling nature of the Grand Canyon as a new day begins. This majestic American landscape is available as either a large or moderately sized Fine Art Canvas and both are simply gorgeous. As the artist’s wife, Kristi, explained to us, “I’ve always regretted that we sold this painting. I really wanted us to keep it. Now, I finally have one to hang!”

12. William Phillips Winter Splendor   $850.00

“The primal solitude of the place,” answers artist William S. Phillips when asked what it is he would most like to convey about the Grand Canyon. “On this particular morning, I was on the South Rim of the canyon between Yavapai and Mather Point and had hit the trail long before dawn. It was freezing, three to four degrees, with tendrils of moisture in the air and snow clinging to everything.

“As the sun rose, the northern walls of the canyon and the clouds above were illuminated with the warmest of light. It was only five minutes or so after the sun came up, so really there was no discernible change in temperature but the grandeur of the moment and the promise of a new day here in this beautiful place, warmed my soul.”

William S. Phillips’ Winter Splendor captures the inspiring and humbling nature of the Grand Canyon as a new day begins. This majestic American landscape is available as either a large or moderately sized Fine Art Canvas and both are simply gorgeous. As the artist’s wife, Kristi, explained to us, “I’ve always regretted that we sold this painting. I really wanted us to keep it. Now, I finally have one to hang!”

13. William Phillips Two Down One to Go   $595.00

Famed Tuskegee airman Lt. C.D. “Lucky” Lester of the 332nd Fighter Group scores his second of three victories over German aircraft, not only in a single day, but in less than five minutes. Fly wingman on bomber escort with this legendary aviator over the skies of occupied Italy with this dramatic William S. Phillips Fine Art Canvas Edition

14. William Phillips Mission Complete The Journey Continues LIMITED EDITION CO-SIGN   $495.00

William Phillips’ first connection to the Doolittle Raid was through his father, an actor who played Lt. Donald Smith, pilot of plane 15 in the film 30 Seconds over Tokyo. In the early 1980s, Phillips’ sought out General Doolittle to consult on his idea for a painting, The Giant Begins to Stir. That meeting began a 30-year relationship with the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders and over a dozen paintings creating a one of kind visual history the historical event.

“I wanted this painting to have the feel of a Hollywood ending and I wanted it to be General Doolittle’s plane,” says Phillips. “The mission itself may be complete. But the sense of honor and duty that these men exhibited that day, that is something on which you can base your entire life. For the Raiders, it did.”

Mission Complete, The Journey Continues is counter-signed by all the attendees of the 70th Anniversary Doolittle Tokyo Raiders Reunion:

Col. Richard E. Cole
Doolittle’s Co-pilot of plane No. 1

Maj. Thomas C. Griffin
Navigator on plane No. 9

Maj. Edward J. Saylor
Engineer-Gunner of plane No. 15

Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher
Engineer-Gunner of plane No. 7

In addition to the actual signatures of these surviving Raiders on the giclèe canvas reproduced within the image are signatures of over 40 of the members of the April 18, 1942 mission. Phillips took his original painting of The Giant Begins to Stir to the Raiders 41st Reunion and had each attending member paint his signature on the painting. Phillips’ filled in the names, by aircraft, of the rest of the airmen. Mission Complete, The Journey Continues is a beautiful, unique and complete historical document of one of the finest hours of American military history.

15. William Phillips Rising into the Storm Limited Edition   $395.00

“They came from our secret base at Shangri-La,” replied President Franklin Delano Roosevelt when asked by reporters where the “land-based” bombers of Lt. Colonel “Jimmy” Doolittle’s raid had originated. In reality, Shangri-La was the USS Hornet and the idea of launching B-25s from an aircraft carrier was the result of determined and superb inter-service conception, planning and execution.

It is now 70 years since the USS Hornet’s loudspeakers blared, “Army pilots man your battle stations for take off!” Task Force 16 had been detected at 7:38 AM April 18, 1942, a staggering 170 miles short of their estimated point of departure, by the Japanese picket boat No. 23 Nitto Maru. The decision was quickly made to launch the attack early. Doolittle’s aircraft, the first to go, roared down and off the deck of the Hornet at 8:20 AM. Fifty-nine minutes later, by 9:19 AM, the sixteenth plane, under the commanded of Lt. W.G. Farrow, was headed towards Japan.

To celebrate the 70th Anniversary of this historic event the five surviving Doolittle Tokyo Raiders will gather at The National Museum of the US Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB April 17- 20, 2012. Consider this: of the 80 officers and crew that flew the one-way mission into enemy territory that day, there remain today only enough airmen to man a single B-25.

William S. Phillips’ Rising Into the Storm places us just off the bow of the Hornet seconds after Doolittle’s B-25 has left the deck. The atmosphere moments before had been tense. While two test take-offs from the ship had been performed months earlier off Norfolk, VA, those aircraft were not fully laden with fuel, bombs and crew. Throttles at full power, flaps down and his B-25 straining against its brakes, the plane rattled and roared as Doolittle waited for the release from the flag man.

When the signal was given, it was timed so that the carrier would be surging up on the crest of a wave as Doolittle’s plane left the deck. The joint velocity of the aircraft, ship and headwind pushed 50 knots. As Doolittle cleared the bow, a wind blast combined with the nose-high attitude they practiced, shot his Mitchell bomber sharply up in the air. He leveled out before stalling just as the mighty Hornet crashed back into the sea.

At his side sat Lt. Richard E. Cole, his co-pilot and one of the co-signers of the 70th Anniversary Commemorative Editions of Rising Into the Storm. Time has been kind and granted you the opportunity to own an authentic piece of Doolittle Raider history. These editions, beautiful works of art unto themselves, become historical documents when signed by the actual Raiders attending their 70th reunion in Dayton, OH:
Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole
Co-pilot of No. 1

Maj. Thomas C. Griffin
Navigator on No. 9

Lt. Col. Robert L. Hite
Co-pilot of No. 16

Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor
Engineer-Gunner of No. 15

Master Sgt. David J. Thatcher
Engineer-Gunner of No. 7

There are two separate editions of Rising Into the Storm. The Fine Paper Art Edition, to be countersigned by the Raiders attending the 70th Anniversary Reunion, measures 27 x 23 1/2 and is limited to an edition 200. Designed into the border area of this print, along with the real signatures of actual Raid participants, is a complete roster, by plane, of the original Doolittle Raiders. The Fine Art Giclée Canvas is a stunning 36 x 22 and looks and feels like the original work of art. This edition will be signed by the Raiders attending the 70th reunion and is limited, in honor of the event, to an edition of 70.

Nearly three quarters of a century ago, 80 men, all volunteers, unhesitatingly climbed aboard their B-25 bombers with the full knowledge that their aircraft did not have the range to land at the friendly airfields the mission design had called for. It is a sense of duty that any service member can relate to; theirs is a job where uncommon acts of valor are common place. Of those original 80 airmen, only five remain. Purchase this piece of history before time passes you by.

Royalties from the sale of these or any other Doolittle Raider Fine Art Editions support the Doolittle Tokyo Raider Scholarship Fund.

16. William Phillips The Grand Expedition   $495.00

Drift the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon and you enter a cathedral that could only have been built by the hand of God. It is a journey of an infinite variety of colors and hues, where no view or form is ever duplicated. Here, on the cool running river, the enormity and splendor of this great creation is revealed anew with every wind and turn.

With The Grand Expedition William S. Phillips gives us a spectator’s view a John Wesley Powell encampment on one of his expeditions through the uncharted canyons of this American treasure. Powell passed down this watercourse twice, first in 1869, then again in 1871-1872. He and his crews did so in specially designed dories that were state of the art designs for the day. Today, the idea shooting the rapids of the uncharted Colorado in these tiny vessels inspires as much awe as the Canyon’s views themselves.

“There is nothing more majestic to behold than the Grand Canyon at sunset,” asserts Phillips. “You begin with those stripes of horizontal color, layers upon layers of limestone to sandstone to granite. Throughout the day, as the sun transverses the sky, their colors change from instant to instant but nothing is more brilliant than when the low sun strikes the great walls and stone faces at day’s end.”

Shapes, forms and colors rise and fall in countless arrays throughout William S. Phillips’ The Grand Expedition. This artwork is available as both a 33” x 22” MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas in an edition of only 25 or as a regular sized 28” x 16” Fine Art Canvas in an edition of 50. Each of these magnificent works of art captures a momentary glimpse of history and beauty that can only be found in the great American southwest.

17. William Phillips The Grand Expedition   $695.00

Drift the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon and you enter a cathedral that could only have been built by the hand of God. It is a journey of an infinite variety of colors and hues, where no view or form is ever duplicated. Here, on the cool running river, the enormity and splendor of this great creation is revealed anew with every wind and turn.

With The Grand Expedition William S. Phillips gives us a spectator’s view a John Wesley Powell encampment on one of his expeditions through the uncharted canyons of this American treasure. Powell passed down this watercourse twice, first in 1869, then again in 1871-1872. He and his crews did so in specially designed dories that were state of the art designs for the day. Today, the idea shooting the rapids of the uncharted Colorado in these tiny vessels inspires as much awe as the Canyon’s views themselves.

“There is nothing more majestic to behold than the Grand Canyon at sunset,” asserts Phillips. “You begin with those stripes of horizontal color, layers upon layers of limestone to sandstone to granite. Throughout the day, as the sun transverses the sky, their colors change from instant to instant but nothing is more brilliant than when the low sun strikes the great walls and stone faces at day’s end.”

Shapes, forms and colors rise and fall in countless arrays throughout William S. Phillips’ The Grand Expedition. This artwork is available as both a 33” x 22” MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas in an edition of only 25 or as a regular sized 28” x 16” Fine Art Canvas in an edition of 50. Each of these magnificent works of art captures a momentary glimpse of history and beauty that can only be found in the great American southwest.

18. William Phillips On Wings and A Prayer ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

It is the summer of 1940. A woman rides her bike through the English countryside. Dawn has broken and the land begins to stir with the sound of birds and farm animals. But this summer the wind carries another sound as well, that of warplanes rising into amber skies.

This is the summer of the Battle of Britain and the inhabitants of this small island nation struggle for their very way of life against a menacing foe amassed along the eastern coast of Europe.

The woman stops, gazes upward and offers a silent prayer, as Spitfires from 92 Squadron roar skyward to search out and destroy the encroaching fighters and bombers of Hitler's Luftwaffe.

During the Battle of Britain there were three groups equipped with Spitfires. They were #11 Group in the south, #10 Group in the wand #5 Group in the northeast. They were all three flying mainly Spitfire MK IIs.

What sets a Phillips work of aviation art apart from others is his prowess as a landscape artist. This Anniversary Fine Art Edition Canvas captures all the vivid color and brilliance of the original William S. Phillips work of art. At 30 x 20 this exclusive release of On Wings as a Prayer matches the size of the original painting and is 35% larger than the paper print released in 1999. This is one of Phillips’ most revered and sought after works of art and a prize for the collection of any true aviation enthusiast.

19. William Phillips Sunset Recovery MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $895.00

Where is the nearest carrier? is often the first question from a President when a crisis erupts overseas. A powerful instrument of diplomacy and military might, the Navy’s carrier battle group has been the United State’s reaction-force-of-choice since World War II.
Collectors, naval and aviation enthusiasts all react in a similar fashion when William S. Phillips turns his painter’s eye on these seagoing airfields. All eight of his previous Fine Art Editions featuring carriers have Sold Out at the Publisher and are only available on the secondary market.
“An aircraft carrier is exciting beyond belief,” beams Phillips. “It’s the tip of the sword and it operates that way. It’s dangerous and it’s exciting. Nothing is static. Their size is phenomenal. The sense of mission and camaraderie from the engine room to the flight crews is inspiring. For the rest of my life, I’ll jump at the chance to get on one whenever I can.”
“In the late 1970s, I had the chance to deploy on the USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) out of San Diego, but this scene could be anywhere in the world because sunsets are universal at sea. Coming on board a carrier is tough no matter what time of day it is. But I’ll tell you, landing in any kind of daylight beats coming aboard before absolute dark. They call flight operations at this time “Pink Ops.” The CAP aircraft, both coming in and going out, are early versions of the F-14.”
There is a Fine Art Edition of Sunset Recovery for every type of collector. There is a special and very limited over-sized 37 x 28 MasterWork® Giclée Canvas edition of only 25 pieces. A more moderately sized yet beautiful 28 x 21 Fine Art Giclée Canvas and a traditional Fine Art Giclée Paper at 24 x 18 are also available. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to own one of William S. Phillips much admired aircraft carrier editions.

20. William Phillips Sunset Recovery   $495.00

Where is the nearest carrier? is often the first question from a President when a crisis erupts overseas. A powerful instrument of diplomacy and military might, the Navy’s carrier battle group has been the United State’s reaction-force-of-choice since World War II.
Collectors, naval and aviation enthusiasts all react in a similar fashion when William S. Phillips turns his painter’s eye on these seagoing airfields. All eight of his previous Fine Art Editions featuring carriers have Sold Out at the Publisher and are only available on the secondary market.
“An aircraft carrier is exciting beyond belief,” beams Phillips. “It’s the tip of the sword and it operates that way. It’s dangerous and it’s exciting. Nothing is static. Their size is phenomenal. The sense of mission and camaraderie from the engine room to the flight crews is inspiring. For the rest of my life, I’ll jump at the chance to get on one whenever I can.”
“In the late 1970s, I had the chance to deploy on the USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) out of San Diego, but this scene could be anywhere in the world because sunsets are universal at sea. Coming on board a carrier is tough no matter what time of day it is. But I’ll tell you, landing in any kind of daylight beats coming aboard before absolute dark. They call flight operations at this time “Pink Ops.” The CAP aircraft, both coming in and going out, are early versions of the F-14.”
There is a Fine Art Edition of Sunset Recovery for every type of collector. There is a special and very limited over-sized 37 x 28 MasterWork® Giclée Canvas edition of only 25 pieces. A more moderately sized yet beautiful 28 x 21 Fine Art Giclée Canvas and a traditional Fine Art Giclée Paper at 24 x 18 are also available. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to own one of William S. Phillips much admired aircraft carrier editions.

21. William Phillips A Prayer for My Brother OPEN EDITION   $275.00

Present A Prayer for My Brother to your local firehouse to show them you are a community that cares.
William S. Phillips was a firefighter before he became an artist. The events on 9/11, ten years ago now, shook him to his core. “You become a firefighter because you are driven by a sense of community and purpose,” Phillips relates. “Firefighters always have, and always will be, walking into that burning building looking to save lives.” As a firefighter from Oregon, Bill had painted this iconic and heroic work of art to support firefighters nationwide.
For 10 years, A Prayer for My Brother has provided funds to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. Its mission is to honor and remember America's fallen fire heroes and to provide resources to assist their survivors in rebuilding their lives. “The self sacrifice continues in every corner of this country and beyond. Some of those men and women rushing into buildings today may have been only a child when 9/11 occurred. It is the same spirit of community and purpose that drives these firefighters today as it did that fateful day in New York City ten years ago.”

22. William Phillips Engaging the Enemy Limited Edition   $395.00

On April 18, 1942 a group of 16 B-25s carrying 80 men emerged from the Pacific sky to launch an historic attack on the central island of the Japanese empire proclaiming with unexpected force that war was coming to the Japanese homeland. Lt. Richard O. Joyce and the crew of Plane 10 (#40-2250) engaged and eluded as many as seventeen Japanese fighter aircraft throughout their mission. S/Sgt. Edwin W. Horton's twin-50s in the top turret played a crucial role in keeping the enemy at bay as Lt. Joyce piloted the B-25 across the hostile skies of Japan and on to China.

Sixty-nine years later, only five of the original 80 airmen that flew on the Doolittle Raid on Japan remain. Just enough to man a single B-25, one last crew. Time has been kind and granted you the opportunity to own an authentic piece of Doolittle Raider history, but that door is closing. The print and canvas editions of Engaging the Enemy will be signed by the actual Raiders attending their 69th reunion.

Engaging the Enemy was painted specifically for the 69th Omaha reunion, home to pilot Richard O. Joyce. The fine art canvas is an exact replica of William S. Phillips’ original 24” x 24” painting. Only by spending tens of thousands dollars for the original could you possess something better. The edition is limited to just 50 copies, so only a few will have the chance to own one.

The fine art print is three pieces of art in one. Two printed remarques, original Phillips pencil renderings of a Mitsubishi Zero and Crew 10’s Mitchell B-25 Bomber, enhance the entire presentation and frame the Raider’s signing area. The reproduction quality of this Giclée Paper is second to none.

You will own, with the print or canvas, a true and authentic historical document. No other artist has developed the deep relationship that Phillips has with the Doolittle Raiders. “Remembering the sacrifices of brave men and women helps us become more aware of how we should view this great country and the freedoms we so often take for granted,” says Bill Phillips. “This art helps us to keep these memories alive and gives us something to pass on to the next generation.”

Doolittle Raiders committed to sign: Col. Richard E. Cole, Col. Robert Hite, Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, Maj. Thomas Griffin and S/Sgt. David J. Thatcher.

23. William Phillips Choctaw Afternoon SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

Never destined to win a beauty pageant, the Choctaw’s good looks were always in the eyes of the beholder. And in the Sikorsky UH-34, the Marines found their girl. Affectionately called the “Huss,” the Choctaw went ashore as part of the first Marine aircraft unit in the Republic of Vietnam in 1962 and served in country until April1969. Here a pair of UH-34’s ply the skies over South Vietnam on an assault support mission ferrying troops and supplies.

24. William Phillips Welcome Home Yank ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

A B-24 has lost one engine and streams smoke from another. She’s close to the White Cliffs of Dover but not out of trouble. Any second now, the last power may fail. Without enough altitude for a safe bail-out, her crew will brace for ditching and the English Channel is cold and choppy. She’s got one thing going for her¯a Spitfire Mark IXB of the 403 Squadron based at Kenley-Middlesex has come to meet her and weaves above. If her pilot chooses to ditch, the Spit pilot will tell Air-Sea Rescue.

When Bill did this painting, he liked it from the start. Old bomber pilots like it, too. Many recalled the exact situation, the irony of struggling out of enemy skies only to go down a few miles from the home base and the joy of seeing an RAF plane coming to ride herd. Built as an interceptor, the Spitfire lacked range for escorting the bombers very far. But all agreed that the plane was a beauty and never more so than when it played Samaritan for its wounded allies.

25. William Phillips The Dream Fulfilled Where the Love Light Shines ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

“It’s the holiday season of December 1945 in a small town somewhere in the U.S.,” says artist’s William S. Phillips. “The celebration is even more special this year because the war is finally over and the three generations of the family I’ve been portraying in my previous paintings If Only in My Dreams and A Christmas Leave, When Dreams Come True are finally reunited for good.”

The son, who has been fighting in the war, walks up the steps to his grandparents’ home with his fiancTe, followed by the loyal dog that waited for him in If Only in My Dreams and rode with him on his way to propose marriage in A Christmas Leave. The Beechcraft Staggerwing in the distance, the classiest of classic planes, found years of post-war service in civilian transport.

William S. Phillips completes one pilot’s story in this seasonal, nostalgic painting from his American Homefront Series in which the change in mood and direction of the war is reflected at home as the series progresses.

26. William Phillips Shadow Dance SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

27. William Phillips Fuel State Critical - Outcome in Doubt   $495.00

The Raider’s carrier task force (TF-16) was spotted by Japanese vessels well before they arrived at the intended departure point so the Raiders were forced to launch from the carrier Hornet earlier than planned. Fuel calculations now fell short of the planned amount needed for their destination, Chuchow, China. Their arrival in China would be at night, rather than during daylight as originally planned. Fortunately, sailors on the Hornet filled ten, five-gallon gas cans and passed them hand-to-hand to each aircraft, providing the fuel that made the difference between pitching at sea and coming down over land.

In this, William S. Phillips most recent historical documentation on the Doolittle Raid, General Doolittle and his crew in aircraft 02344 break into a momentary area of clear sky. The last rays of sunlight bring only slight hope that they will survive their ordeal, as their fuel levels continue to fall and the hour of landfall is uncertain.

Fuel State CriticalùOutcome in Doubt is countered-signed by four of the Doolittle Raiders. The signing of the print took place at their April 2010 reunion in Dayton, OH. They include the Crew 1 co-pilot of Doolittle’s plane (the B-25 depicted here), Colonel Richard E. Cole, Lt. Colonel Robert L. Hite of Crew 16, Major Thomas Carson Griffin of Crew 9 and Staff Sergeant David J. Thatcher of Crew 7.

Phillips’ Personal Commission Edition of the previous Raiders Fine Art Edition, Toward a Setting Sun, reached an edition size of 298. Given that there are only 100 in the edition of Fuel State CriticalùOutcome in Doubt, this piece of history won’t last long!

28. William Phillips Bound for Home SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

29. William Phillips Afternoon Departure at Stoney Point Light   $395.00

Welcome back to Phillips Bay, artist William S. Phillips’ popular nostalgic creation portrayed in his Phillips Bay series of paintings. Stoney Point Light was built in the
mid-1800s on the northern most point of land at the entrance to the inner harbor at Phillips Bay. Its name came from the rugged and treeless landscape along the windswept edge of the channel. The lighthouse keeper who lives and works here has a choice assignment. The rambling cape home runs right up to the lighthouse door so attending to the lighthouse duties, particularly in stormy weather, is close at hand.

The era is the mid-1950s. The Grumman Goose, designed in the 1930s as an eight seat amphibian commuter plane, served in WWII in combat and training. After the war the “Goose” returned to commuter and business use, especially around water, from Catalina, to Alaska, and yes, to Phillips Bay.

30. William Phillips A Christmas Leave When Dreams Come True ANNIVERSARY EDITION ON   $595.00

The American Homefront Series, an episodic look at home life during World War II, comprises some of artist William S. Phillips’ most popular and sought-after works. In this Anniversary Edition of A Christmas Leave, When Dreams Come True, it’s 1943 and the young soldier from the first painting, If Only in My Dreams, is home on leave. “This is one of the fortunate few who got a Christmas leave during World War II,” says the artist. “I wanted a more peaceful feeling in this painting, so the soldier is driving into the sunset. The colors are warmer and the mood is more festive.” There are still shadows on the horizon but the path to victory seems clear.

Look closely at each painting in the Homefront Series to find a plane in the sky. The DC-3 in this painting (known in its wartime version as a C-47) is now a passenger airliner. The dog that waited patiently for his master’s return sits beside his owner on the way to a family reunion, to play cards with the boys or maybe to visit his girl. Tonight on the radio they might even hear, “When Dreams Come True,” immortalized by Count Basie and his Orchestra.

31. William Phillips Fish Tales at Beaver Camp   $525.00

With no offense to the practitioners of the culinary arts, you just can’t beat the taste of a freshly caught trout, skillet fried on an open fire, a hundred miles from the nearest gas-range stove. Need we mention the view? It was designed and built by Mother Nature herself. As for Beaver Camp, well, you can find it anywhere you can land a de Havilland (DHC-2) Beaver, the work-horse float plane of the North Country. As for the fish tales themselves, a great deal of that depends of the company and the day. But as a rule of thumb, consider this: the wider the arms are spread, the greater the tale.

Fish Tales at Beaver Camp and Bill Phillips are featured in the August issue of Western Art Collector. As they say in the story, “Bill produces a sensitive andwonderfully composed landscape, and the depth and perspective of these paintings are outstanding.” We couldn’t agree more.

32. William Phillips Ill Hold You in my Dreams   $595.00

The American Homefront Series, an episodic look at home during World War II, comprises some of William S. Phillips’ most popular and sought-after works. Now, for the first time in over ten years, Phillips has created a new painting in the series: I’ll HoldYou in My Dreams, set on a warm winter day just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. Our young Army Air Force Lieutenant stands out from the crowd as he bids his girl goodbye.

Locomotive 4443 of the Noon Coast “Daylight” slowly eases to a stop at Santa Barbara Station.The next stop is San Luis Obispo, 119 miles up the line. With a scheduled ride time of two hours and eighteen minutes, a passenger might have time for dinner in the dining carùif he wanted to spend at least ninety cents on dinner, or splurge on the fresh mountain trout at $1.50. In the air over the station are two P-38 fighter aircraft on their first test flight, a mere day after rolling off the assembly line in Burbank. Full production of operational aircraft has begun and will continue around the clock.

Young soldiers departing for war after Pearl Harbor faced the unknown road ahead with patriotic and passionate commitment and they held their heads high as they bid their loved ones farewell.

33. William Phillips Reflections   $495.00

“I was nine years old when my father sent me a postcard from the Grand Canyon,” says Phillips. “From that time on, I have been fascinated by its grandeur and ever-changing moods. I have seen the Grand Canyon from numerous vantage pointsù through rumbling summer thunderstorms and howling winter blizzards, from the sky above and along its myriad of trails to the river below. It is always an awesome and humbling experience and one that must be preserved for future generations.” During his time as an Artist in Residence at the Grand Canyon in 2004, Phillips worked hard to interpret the park’s purpose as a place of pleasure and its importance as a national treasure. His magnificent works from that period, including Reflections, testify to the majesty of the American landscape.

34. William Phillips Chasing the Daylight MASTERWORK ANNIVERSARY EDITION   $850.00

“My interest in the Daylight was sparked as a young boy,” says the artist, “when my parents took me down to the Sepulveda Boulevard crossing in Los Angeles to watch the train, arriving from San Francisco, roar by. It was a magnificent sight, with a full head of steam up and the late afternoon sun glinting off its sparkling surface.

“I enjoy trains and ride them every chance I get and on one such trip, I watched as a small speck in the sky turned out to be an N2S-2 Stearman»a biplane produced for the Naval Air Training Command. I promised myself I would capture the scene on canvas one day.”

Pilots without instruments can drop low to follow the “iron compass” for directional guidance when storm clouds block visibility. These two U.S. Navy trainees can’t resist the adrenaline rush of pitting their winged racers against the speeding steam engine.

35. William Phillips Pride of Arizona SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

36. William Phillips New Sounds in an Ancient Canyon   $725.00

Phillips’ passion for aviation is second only to his infatuation with the American experience and the impact that the land, its people, its history and its values have upon one another. This is what he calls The American Landscape, paintings about a time, a place and the course of American events.

The Grand Canyon is the iconic American landscape. For millennia, the only sounds heard in the Canyon were those of the elements and all things wild. As man arrived the sounds of early domestication could, only faintly, be heard. By the late 1800s, outfits such as Wellington Starky’s Diamond Bar Ranch heralded the news that cattle was king, even in the Grand Canyon.

In 1919, man took to the skies over the Canyon for the first time. A mere nine years later, Grand Canyon Airlines was taking tourists on scenic flights in Ford Tri-Motors such as this one, bouncing the drone of radial engines from ancient rim to ancient rim. Flights such as this confirmed that as yet another era neared its end in the Canyon, a new one had begun as the crown jewel of the American Landscape.

37. William Phillips The Moonwatchers ANNIVERSARY EDITION   $795.00

Let Your Heart Come Home to Phillips Bay

This is a celebration of commitment and enduring romance, says William S. Phillips. It is a love story, one that speaks of love in its various stages. You cannot help but wonder how many times our moonwatchers have held hands and shared dreams sorrows as they have watched each season pass and each new moon wax and wane.

Our couple sits quietly with their dogs, gazing out across chapters of their lives. There is the warm and comfortable home that has heard the laughter of children; there is the church where they were married so many years ago. And there in the distance, is 'their' moon. I hope this print can be shared and appreciated by lovers-the moonwatchers-of any age.

38. William Phillips Christmas Traditions at Watchman Hill Inn   $450.00

Against a golden sunset, a Sikorsky VS-44 approaches the harbor at Phillips Bay. As the brisk night air descends on this first night of December, Santa Claus arrives at the Watchman Hill Inn, heralded by two men in Revolutionary War dress and the traditional firing of the cannon. During the Revolutionary War, a citizens’ militia kept watch over the Outer Bay from the hill. If they spied British ships on the horizon, the cannon’s voice would alert the townsfolk to prepare a defense. These days, the sounding of the cannon is a cause for merriment. The holiday season in Phillips Bay is filled with the traditional joys of colored lights, caroling, feasting and church services, accompanied by a fresh blanket of snow.

39. William Phillips Into the Arms of the Dragon Limited Edition   $450.00

The Doolittle Raid on Japan was always designed as a one way mission: from the carrier to friendly airfields in China by way of Tokyo. Due to early discovery by Japanese picket boats, Captain David Jones and the rest of Crew 5 (aircraft 02283) left the deck of the USS Hornet knowing their one-way trip was perilously shorter. They knew that their B-25 did not have the range to make those friendly airfields, and getting to the China coast or past Japanese-occupied China would take great skill and uncommon luck. At a small break in the cloud cover over Chu Chow the members of Crew 5, who could coax their aircraft no further, left the plane, trusting their parachutes, the wind and the Chinese people to lead them to safety.
In Chinese folklore the l=ng, or dragon, symbolizes all that is good: abundance, prosperity, good fortune, nobility, and divine protection, as well as the Chinese people themselves. The dragon is believed to be the benevolent guardian of water, as well as life-giving rain and storms. As they tumbled into the stormy night sky, David Jones and his crew entrusted their safetyùand their livesùto the arms of the dragon.
The Chinese paid dearly for the aid and shelter they provided to American soldiers. In the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign, Japanese forces killed an estimated 250,000 Chinese civilians as retaliation and intimidation to prevent further assistance of American soldiers. The brave sacrifices of the Chinese saved many lives and solidified the American people in their determination to succeed. William S. Phillips inspiring new limited edition Into the Arms of the Dragon pays tribute to the combined efforts of two nations. Both the Fine Art Limited Edition GiclTe Canvas and Fine Art Limited Edition GiclTe Print of this spectacular image have been signed by MSgt. Edwin Horton, Jr., Col. William M. Bower, David J. Thatcher, Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole, Thomas Griffin, and Col. Robert Hite.

40. William Phillips Into the Arms of the Dragon   $995.00

The Doolittle Raid on Japan was always designed as a one way mission: from the carrier to friendly airfields in China by way of Tokyo. Due to early discovery by Japanese picket boats, Captain David Jones and the rest of Crew 5 (aircraft 02283) left the deck of the USS Hornet knowing their one-way trip was perilously shorter. They knew that their B-25 did not have the range to make those friendly airfields, and getting to the China coast or past Japanese-occupied China would take great skill and uncommon luck. At a small break in the cloud cover over Chu Chow the members of Crew 5, who could coax their aircraft no further, left the plane, trusting their parachutes, the wind and the Chinese people to lead them to safety.
In Chinese folklore the l=ng, or dragon, symbolizes all that is good: abundance, prosperity, good fortune, nobility, and divine protection, as well as the Chinese people themselves. The dragon is believed to be the benevolent guardian of water, as well as life-giving rain and storms. As they tumbled into the stormy night sky, David Jones and his crew entrusted their safetyùand their livesùto the arms of the dragon.
The Chinese paid dearly for the aid and shelter they provided to American soldiers. In the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign, Japanese forces killed an estimated 250,000 Chinese civilians as retaliation and intimidation to prevent further assistance of American soldiers. The brave sacrifices of the Chinese saved many lives and solidified the American people in their determination to succeed. William S. Phillips inspiring new limited edition Into the Arms of the Dragon pays tribute to the combined efforts of two nations. Both the Fine Art Limited Edition GiclTe Canvas and Fine Art Limited Edition GiclTe Print of this spectacular image have been signed by MSgt. Edwin Horton, Jr., Col. William M. Bower, David J. Thatcher, Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole, Thomas Griffin, and Col. Robert Hite.

41. William Phillips Ill Hold You in my Dreams MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $1250.00

The American Homefront Series, an episodic look at home during World War II, comprises some of William S. Phillips’ most popular and sought-after works. Now, for the first time in over ten years, Phillips has created a new painting in the series: I’ll HoldYou in My Dreams, set on a warm winter day just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. Our young Army Air Force Lieutenant stands out from the crowd as he bids his girl goodbye.

Locomotive 4443 of the Noon Coast “Daylight” slowly eases to a stop at Santa Barbara Station.The next stop is San Luis Obispo, 119 miles up the line. With a scheduled ride time of two hours and eighteen minutes, a passenger might have time for dinner in the dining carùif he wanted to spend at least ninety cents on dinner, or splurge on the fresh mountain trout at $1.50. In the air over the station are two P-38 fighter aircraft on their first test flight, a mere day after rolling off the assembly line in Burbank. Full production of operational aircraft has begun and will continue around the clock.

Young soldiers departing for war after Pearl Harbor faced the unknown road ahead with patriotic and passionate commitment and they held their heads high as they bid their loved ones farewell.

42. William Phillips Westbound A Date with the General   $1295.00

“When we get to Chunking, I’m going to give you all a party that you won’t forget,” was Lt. Colonel James Doolittle’s promise to the 16 B-25 crews aboard the USS Hornet a few days before their historic air raid on Japan. By late afternoon on April 18th, 1942 the relative safety of the China coast was all that Lt. Donald G. Smith’s crew had on their minds. The 15th aircraft (# 40-2267) to leave the carrier’s deck had bombed its targets in Kobe, Japan but the crewmen knew they’d never make their designated landing strip on the Chinese mainland. The weather had become increasingly worse and visibility had dropped to zero. Lt. Smith was forced to ditch his bomber off an island on the Chinese Coast near Sangchow.

All of Aircraft 15’s crew would eventually make their way to Chunking but sixteen of the other Doolittle’s Raiders did not. Doolittle himself would rise to the rank of full General. It is the stuff of aviator legend that when the last Raider makes his final flight westward into the day’s fading light he will be greeted by his fellow Raiders and the General and they will have a party never to be forgotten.

When Bill Phillips painted The Giant Begins to Stir, he embarked on an artist’s journey that grew to become a visual history of the United States’ response to the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor: Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle’s air raid on Japan launched, for the first time ever, from the sea. The Greenwich Workshop limited edition of The Giant Begins to Stir (co-signed by surviving Doolittle Raiders) was followed by I Could Never Be So Lucky Again (co-signed by Jimmy Doolittle) and Evasive Action at Sagami Bay, (co-signed by surviving Doolittle Raiders.) The final painting in this series is Westbound: A Date with the General, illustrates the dramatic flight of Lt. Smith’s Crew #15. The limited edition print and canvas have both been signed by Maj. Gen. USAF David Jones, (Ret.), Col. USAF William Bower, (Ret.), Lt. Col. USAF Richard Cole, (Ret.), Lt. Col. USAF Edward Saylor, (Ret.), Navigator Charles Ozuk, Jr., Navigator Thomas Griffin, MSgt USAF Edwin Horton Jr., (Ret.) and Engineer Gunner David Thatcher.

“Why chronicle any historical event?” asks artist Bill Phillips. Because paintings like Westbound: A Date with the General,' he says, “help us to understand the times in which we live. Remembering the sacrifices of brave men and women help us to be more aware of how we should view this great country and the freedoms we so often take for granted.”

In an interesting aside, Bill Phillips’ father, a character actor in Los Angeles in the 1940s and ’50s, played a pilot in the film 30 Seconds Over Tokyo, as well as in Dive Bomber, and as Sergeant Kirby in A Yank in Korea.

43. William Phillips Denali Summer   $725.00

Bill Phillips’ new painting Denali Summer features two celebrated icons of the far North: one natural, one man-made. The forbidding and beautiful Alaskan wilds provide the backdrop for the legendary workhorse of the Alaskan bush: a De Havilland Beaver float plane. As the plane roars over the summer tundra, the icy river below rushes and tumbles its contents of glacial silt. On the distant horizon, America’s highest peak dominates the horizon. (Mount McKinley is also known as Denali, or “The High One,” in the language of the local people.) Mount McKinley’s scale is so massive that the mountain actually creates its own weather, and today its peak sparkles in the brilliant sunlight of one of the few cloudless days of the year.

44. William Phillips Christmas Eve at the Ahwahnee   $450.00

As the fourth in the “Inns of Christmas” series, William S. Phillips captures the spirit of the season, as well as a glimpse of Santa, with Christmas Eve at the Ahwahnee. Christmas magic has created collector magic,making Sold Out editions of Christmas Eve Delivery, Christmas Eve at the Winchester Inn and Winter Visitors at Kringle Hill Inn.

Imagine Santa’s joy while flying over our national treasure of Yosemite National Park and arriving at the majestic Ahwahnee Hotel. This National Historical Landmark represents the great American outdoors and is known for its granite fatade, striking beamed ceilings, massive stone hearths and richly colored Native American artwork. Although beautiful and elegant in any season, the Ahwahnee is especially stunning in winter. Each December, the Ahwahnee hosts The Bracebridge Dinner, a feast of food, song and mirth. The holiday season, with its great pageantry and a sumptuous feast fit for a king, is an event even Santa wouldn’t miss.

45. William Phillips Returning Fire   $395.00

The Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk is a twin-turbine engine, single rotor, semi-monocoque fuselage, rotary wing helicopter. The medium-lift utility or assault helicopter was the winner of a United States Army competition in the late 1970s to replace the Huey (UH-1) family. Although the two final competing designs were both developed to Army specifications, the UH-60 was selected over an entry from Boeing-Vertol. It would go on to serve as the basis for variants in service with other branches of the US military. The Black Hawk can perform a wide array of missions, including the tactical transport of troops, electronic warfare and aero medical evacuation. In air assault operations it can move a squad of 11 combat troops with equipment, with advanced avionics and electronics provide increased survivability and capability.

In William S. Phillips' Returning Fire, the Black Hawk crew assigned to the 101st Airborne takes evasive action and releases flares and machine gun fire after being fired upon during a sortie late in the day over Iraq.

46. William Phillips Into the Sunlit Splendor Avia COLLECTOR BOOK WITH   $595.00

Greenwich Workshop Press is pleased to present the fine art book of the season, Into the Sunlit Splendor: The Aviation Art of William S. Phillips, featuring over 130 paintings in a definitive collection of his aviation art.

This deluxe Collector’s Edition® book and fine art canvas set is extremely limited edition comes, jacketed and slipcased with a special, bound-in certificate sheet signed by the artist.The set is completed by the Limited Edition Fine Art GiclTe Canvas, Lightning from the Sun, signed by the artist and numbered.

Lightning from the Sun showcases the Lockheed P-38 Lightning, the first fighter with two engines. Nearly 10,000 P-38s were produced, in eighteen variants. Known to the Germans as the “Forked Tailed Devil,” a leading P-38 Ace called it, “ one of the great aircraft of WWII.” And Japanese Ace Saburo Sakai said,“I was astonished to find an American aircraft that could outrun, outclimb and outdive our Zero .”

47. William Phillips GUARDIAN AT THE GATE   $495.00

Point Bonita Light, at the North West entrance to the San Francisco Bay was the second lighthouse at Point Bonita. The first light was atop the narrow headlands and shown forth at 306 feet above the roaring breakers of the Pacific. The only problem was that it was so high that most of the time it was obscured by fog.

In 1877 the Point Bonita light was relocated, with great effort, to the thin strip of rock called Lands End where it stands today as a guardian at the Gate. A welcome sight to those entering the San Francisco Bay from around the globe.

48. William Phillips THE TENDER CARES OF AUTUMN   $695.00

One of the Phillips Bay collection of limited edition prints and canvases.



The seasons take another turn in Phillips Bay, North America’s quintessential hometown. Your stroll along Seven-Mile Walk has reached the Beecher House, where the famed poet lived through the mid-1960s. A young girl, her basket laden with freshly cut flowers, pauses to admire the fiery red and tawny orange of the Indian summer maples, as the poet certainly once did. The sun has dipped below the horizon leaving a soft-pink glow in the sky and one by one the lights begin to twinkle across the Inner Bay. Soft water sounds are carried on an irregular warm-cool breeze, another hint that fall has arrived at the hidden treasure that is Phillips Bay. Published from the artist’s original
oil painting.

49. William Phillips Splitting a Pair   $195.00

Racing earthward in a near vertical dive, its turbocharged Allison engines driving the counter-rotating props at full throttle with a 20mm cannon and quad-50's spitting lead, you'd have a hard time convincing these two Luftwaffe pilots that the P-38 Lightning on their tail was not originally conceived as anything other than a fighter airplane. Originally designed as a bomber-interceptor, it was respectfully nicknamed by the German’s as the "Fork-Tailed Devil" who were bedeviled by this troublesome aircraft from North Africa to Berlin.

50. William Phillips ACCOMPANIMENT TO THE SYMPHONY OF SPRING   $695.00

Spring has arrived in the coastal town of Phillips Bay and so has the annual music festival — one of the most anticipated events of the year. While the audience gathers ‘round the gazebo to look and listen while three musicians warm up, the rest of the quartet — a violinist — practices her strings solo. (Perhaps she’s a bit nervous?) A magical moment for sure, the longer light of day is still evident as the full moon rises and the street lamps and walkway lights come on as a lovely overture to the symphony of spring.

51. William Phillips AMONG THE COLUMNS OF THOR   $295.00