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1. John Buxton A Brief Delay At The Wall   $845.00

An abundant lacework of rivers, streams and lakes offered an easy means of travel for the Native Americans of the Northeast. The drama and beauty of these natural highways could be extraordinary. This great wall of water, with its deafening roar and constant cascade of mist, provides a welcome break from their bark canoes. Soon, they will portage around and above this waterfall to calmer waters and resume their journey through this unspoiled wilderness.

2. John Buxton A Brief Delay At The Wall   $395.00

An abundant lacework of rivers, streams and lakes offered an easy means of travel for the Native Americans of the Northeast. The drama and beauty of these natural highways could be extraordinary. This great wall of water, with its deafening roar and constant cascade of mist, provides a welcome break from their bark canoes. Soon, they will portage around and above this waterfall to calmer waters and resume their journey through this unspoiled wilderness.

3. John Buxton Wilderness Inroads MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $395.00

Part of Indianapolis’ Eiteljorg Museum’s permanent collection, Buxton’s Wilderness Inroads astutely captures the allegory of the ever expanding European incursion into North America. While their deep approach into the territory was initially masked by the sound of the river’s rapids, their startling appearance has caught these Native Americans off-guard. Do they have the numbers to defend their land or do they give in to the increasing tide?

4. John Buxton Making Smoke Building Trade and Trust   $395.00

Early Eastern fur trade was beneficial to both Native American and European powers. Many people of the various Algonquin and Iroquois Nations brought their furs to exchange for blankets, cooking pots, knives, axes, guns and powder, cloth, metal trinkets and other trade goods. The Europeans established large trade centers along rivers and the Great Lakes where the Indians could bring vast quantities of deer, beaver, fox and other animal hides to swap and bargain for those beneficial goods held by the Dutch and later, the English and French.

However, there were numerous less formal trades and trade sites where one or more local Indians might agree to parley a favorable exchange with an independent trader. John Buxton has chosen to show this exchange. Several Natives have come by canoe with a few good furs and the French trader has laid out some of his goods. There is a hint, judging from two French artillery men standing in the background, that perhaps this scene may not be very far from a French fort or trading post.

Things appear to have gone well. The Frenchman has accepted an offer to “pass the pipe” among the friendly negotiators. They have, in turn, accepted him as dealing with them fairly and this making of smoke is their way of acknowledgement. Both parties are expressing an interest in many future exchanges.

5. John Buxton Making Smoke Building Trade and Trust MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $850.00

Early Eastern fur trade was beneficial to both Native American and European powers. Many people of the various Algonquin and Iroquois Nations brought their furs to exchange for blankets, cooking pots, knives, axes, guns and powder, cloth, metal trinkets and other trade goods. The Europeans established large trade centers along rivers and the Great Lakes where the Indians could bring vast quantities of deer, beaver, fox and other animal hides to swap and bargain for those beneficial goods held by the Dutch and later, the English and French.

However, there were numerous less formal trades and trade sites where one or more local Indians might agree to parley a favorable exchange with an independent trader. John Buxton has chosen to show this exchange. Several Natives have come by canoe with a few good furs and the French trader has laid out some of his goods. There is a hint, judging from two French artillery men standing in the background, that perhaps this scene may not be very far from a French fort or trading post.

Things appear to have gone well. The Frenchman has accepted an offer to “pass the pipe” among the friendly negotiators. They have, in turn, accepted him as dealing with them fairly and this making of smoke is their way of acknowledgement. Both parties are expressing an interest in many future exchanges.

6. John Buxton A Secret Cache   $345.00

Museum quality art for your home is not just ad-copy, it’s what you get from The Greenwich Workshop. John Buxton’s A Secret Cache is the 2013 winner of the Quest for the West Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award and hangs on display at Indianapolis’ Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art.

This work is a seminar unto itself in how a great artist uses design to tell a story. Plunder was as vital a means of support on the frontier as trade. After distribution of any “”windfall” among the tribe, the surplus would be hidden in a secure location. Buxton’s choice of a zig-zag composition draws your eye continuously up and down the painting. The only verticals in the painting are the Indians themselves, causing you to stop and inspect what each one is doing. The lack of a strong source of light adds to the secretive nature of the moment. Your eyes never leave the painting.

Reminiscent of the long sold out and highly-sought after God’s Gift, A Secret Cache is a Fine Art Edition Giclče Canvas, set in an edition of only 35 and will certainly become a collector’s item as well. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to own A Secret Cache, truly museum quality art for your home.

7. John Buxton Ambush 1725 at Lovewell Pond   $450.00

Artist John Buxton’s new Fine Art Edition depicts the calm before the storm of an American Indian surprise attack on militiamen. Captain John Lovewell of New England, a ranger and renowned scalp hunter, died on May 8, 1725 as he led a third expedition against the Abenaki Indians in an area now known as Fryeburg, Maine. A number of colonial militiamen and Abenaki Native Americans, including a notorious war chief named Paugus, also died in the engagement which marked the end of hostilities between the Abenaki and the white colonists in this part of the colonies.

More than 100 years later, the event was immortalized in a poem The Battle of Lovell's Pond, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, author of Paul Revere's Ride, and The Song of Hiawatha.

One of the verses reads:
The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,
Have sunk to their rest; the damp earth is their bed,
No stone tells the place where their ashes repose,
Nor points out the spot from the graves of their foes.

I'm a historical artist. I don't claim to be a historian, said Buxton who is known for his painstaking research into every detail. He hired a Maine historian to help him explore the banks of what is now Lake Lovewell in Maine. They canoed the lake and saw the actual sites of Captain Lovewell’s exploits. Buxton noted the steep slope of the bank, the vegetation and fully imagined the scene that eventually took shape on his canvas. The original painting was commissioned by a direct descendant of Captain John Lovewell. Now you, too, can own a piece of this remarkable Colonial New England history.

8. John Buxton Ambush 1725 at Lovewell Pond MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $950.00

Artist John Buxton’s new Fine Art Edition depicts the calm before the storm of an American Indian surprise attack on militiamen. Captain John Lovewell of New England, a ranger and renowned scalp hunter, died on May 8, 1725 as he led a third expedition against the Abenaki Indians in an area now known as Fryeburg, Maine. A number of colonial militiamen and Abenaki Native Americans, including a notorious war chief named Paugus, also died in the engagement which marked the end of hostilities between the Abenaki and the white colonists in this part of the colonies.

More than 100 years later, the event was immortalized in a poem The Battle of Lovell's Pond, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, author of Paul Revere's Ride, and The Song of Hiawatha.

One of the verses reads:
The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,
Have sunk to their rest; the damp earth is their bed,
No stone tells the place where their ashes repose,
Nor points out the spot from the graves of their foes.

I'm a historical artist. I don't claim to be a historian, said Buxton who is known for his painstaking research into every detail. He hired a Maine historian to help him explore the banks of what is now Lake Lovewell in Maine. They canoed the lake and saw the actual sites of Captain Lovewell’s exploits. Buxton noted the steep slope of the bank, the vegetation and fully imagined the scene that eventually took shape on his canvas. The original painting was commissioned by a direct descendant of Captain John Lovewell. Now you, too, can own a piece of this remarkable Colonial New England history.

9. John Buxton The Fur Trader   $395.00

In the 18th century, the Iroquois controlled the hunting grounds of western Pennsylvania where John Buxton lives. They rarely granted a commission for a white (or European) to hunt there. They had learned the value of animal pelts in trade and had become dependent upon it. In The Fur Trader, a buyer proudly displays his purchases on this day of trade. Deer hides (the white bundles in the foreground) provided leather and were the item traded for most in bulk. Specialty furs like beaver and fox would bring a higher price when he, in turn, brings them to market. All in all, it is a profitable day for this frontiersman.

In the background, Indians examine the various goods that they will seek in trade for the pelts they have provided. Guns, powder, blankets, copper pots, mirrors where popular items. Ultimately, the Indians traded away much more than they bargained for. Native Americans were self-sufficient people prior to the arrival of the Europeans and the idea of trading for goods. Ultimately, it changed the way they lived.

10. John Buxton As a Feather on Water SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

11. John Buxton Winter Windfall   $575.00

Winner of the Patron’s Choice Award at the 2009 Quest for the West show at The Eitleljorg Museum in Indianapolis, Winter Windfall is a stunning winter landscape from John Buxton. A broken and abandoned hay cart and its precious cargo of supplies is discovered by these woodland Indians. The hay cart is not designed for hauling supplies much less a trip down a backwoods stream. What caused the settlers to decide to make such an ill-prepared winter’s journey down such an arduous path? Such questions certainly entered these warriors’ minds, but taking stock of the bounty they have come across on this fine winter’s morning is the first order of business.

12. John Buxton The Agile Bark Canoe   $695.00

The Native People of the Eastern Woodlands built two types of canoes: dug-outs, fashioned from tree trunks, and more lightweight canoes made of bark, preferably birch since it was easier to form. The men in The Agile Bark Canoe are in hunting canoes of a style attributed to the Passamaquoddy»but perhaps these Indians traded for them, as was done frequently. They were as light as an autumn leaf upon water, with the ability to navigate rivers, shallow streams, marshes and moderate rapids. Being extremely light enabled easy portage between waterways and yet they were capable of carrying heavy loads. A canoe this size (12 feet long by 30 inches wide at its center) could be lifted with one hand and was very stable when fully loaded. The bark canoe was fast and infinitely more versatile than any small craft of the European settlers.

13. John Buxton Dry Moccasins   $495.00

Who could this person be? He is alone and has stopped on his water route long enough to build a fire, have a bit to eat and drink, maybe even to dry items that have gotten wet along the way.

This is the 18th centuryůsomewhere. Is he Englishŕ or their enemy, the French? We cannot see enough of his flintlock to tell if it is of French or English design. He appears to be a trader, but doesn’t have much with him. The cloth near his leg reveals his goods: silver trade items. His pistol is fully cocked; is he fearful? He has no furs and his Algonquin canoe isn’t large enough for many anyway. His mismatched paddles might have come from two different Indian tribes.

Could this man be the English trader, John Frasier, as he escaped downriver from the French soldiers at Venangoůhis trading post on the Allegheny Riverůin 1752? The French had come down from what is now Canada into the Ohio Valley, along the Allegheny River, to rid the region of English influence. They confiscated Frasier’s trading post and a blacksmith shop. Fraser lost all his trade goods but escaped capture.

14. John Buxton Dry Moccasins MASTERWORKS ON   $1250.00

Who could this person be? He is alone and has stopped on his water route long enough to build a fire, have a bit to eat and drink, maybe even to dry items that have gotten wet along the way.

This is the 18th centuryůsomewhere. Is he Englishŕ or their enemy, the French? We cannot see enough of his flintlock to tell if it is of French or English design. He appears to be a trader, but doesn’t have much with him. The cloth near his leg reveals his goods: silver trade items. His pistol is fully cocked; is he fearful? He has no furs and his Algonquin canoe isn’t large enough for many anyway. His mismatched paddles might have come from two different Indian tribes.

Could this man be the English trader, John Frasier, as he escaped downriver from the French soldiers at Venangoůhis trading post on the Allegheny Riverůin 1752? The French had come down from what is now Canada into the Ohio Valley, along the Allegheny River, to rid the region of English influence. They confiscated Frasier’s trading post and a blacksmith shop. Fraser lost all his trade goods but escaped capture.

15. John Buxton The Fording Place   $695.00

It is summer in the Iroquois territory and a small group has set up their temporary camp on the banks of a river, where the fish and game are plentiful. At the end of the season the men and the women will move to higher ground, where more permanent camps keep them out of reach of the winter floods. While women took care of camp chores, men spent most of their time hunting or preparing to hunt, if not preparing for war against some neighboring group. The men of The Fording Place set out across their river in search of yet another unknown daily adventure.

16. John Buxton Coming to Trade   $695.00

John Buxton, “Artist of Our Heritage,” engages both history buffs and art lovers alike with each new Fine Art Limited Edition. His unique combination of detailed historical accuracy and artistic mastery brings the past to life as few others can. In Coming to Trade, Buxton portrays the co-existence between the French and Native Americans. “This painting an iconic depiction of what drew both sides to tolerate the other in what came to be known as the fur trade,” Buxton says. “Furs from the new world helped finance French expansion and trade items enhanced the living standard of the native nations. Bows and arrows were no longer the preferred hunting method and French cutlery replaced stone axes and knives. Cooking pots, needles and even wire soon became highly prized among the Indians as they became slightly more European. French traders, many of whom lived among the Indians, changed as well. They readily accepted native culture and customůto the extent that it was difficult to distinguish a Frenchman from his native ally. Though they tried, Jesuit priests were not quite as successful at transforming natives into cultured, God-fearing Frenchmen.”

17. John Buxton No Sign of Hostiles   $625.00

With each new Fine Art Limited Edition, John Buxton, “Artist of Our Heritage,” engages a new collector base of history buffs and art lovers alike. Buxton’s detailed historical accuracy and artistic mastery bring the past to life. In this latest releasehe portrays the tenuous coexistence between the original inhabitants of this new nation and the encroaching Europeans. “Although loyalties and friendship did exist between some, there were always those allied to other interests ű waiting to do harm,” says Buxton. “No one was exempt from sudden harassment or deadly force, and groups took advantage of hit and run tactics ű striking with surprise. An ambush of the unsuspecting often resulted in quick plunder, hostages taken and a bloody aftermath. If enough men could be gathered before their trail cooled, the raiders would be tracked. Some of these pursuits terminated in another ambush, while occasionally the tracking became too difficult and the trail was lost, as shown in this painting.”

18. John Buxton Washingtons Crossing 1753   $600.00

Washington's Crossing, 1753

In the winter of 1753, a young Major George Washington was sent to Western Pennsylvania to deliver a message to French forces. A return message from the French to the British was entrusted to Washington to be delivered to Williamsburg, Virginia.

19. John Buxton BREAKING CAMP AT TURTLE CREEK   $495.00

The 1758 capture of Ft. Duquesne and subsequent completion of Ft. Pitt in western Pennsylvania lured many expansionist, settlers and traders to this wilderness area. Traveling normally in large groups for protection, this lone family risks misfortune but is here rewarded. A breathtaking winter morning, it's warm greeting sparkles as they prepare to follow the dream onward.

20. John Buxton Great Falls of the Passaic   $595.00

Just outside New York City runs the Passaic River and one of the most impressive sets of waterfalls in the east. The Lenni Lenape Indians knew the falls well as a prime camping and fishing site. They called it “Totowa,” to sink or be forced down beneath the waters by weight, a tribute to this awesome mass of water. The falls were also a natural bottleneck for prodigious amounts of sturgeon during their annual spawn. Long before the canvas sails of the Europeans appeared on the ocean’s horizon, present-day Paterson, New Jersey, was an important and thriving Indian community. John Buxton’s award-winning "Great Falls of the Passaic" is a stirring reminder of the astonishing wilderness sites and bygone way of life that have long since been swallowed up by urban growth. This Fine Art Limited Edition Canvas is a work of that art educates, inspires while bestowing a natural beauty and grace to any room in which it hangs.

21. John Buxton Secluded Pool   $195.00

The gentle flow of a small mountain stream and the inviting gurgle of a waterfall has drawn this duo of frontiersmen to delay their quest. They will enjoy a refreshing moment in an autumn wilderness, unhampered by worldly pressures or whatever the day may bring. Secluded and unburdened and refreshed. Miniature art is an important part of any collection and a SmallWork™ is a simple way to either start or add to your collection. Such works are often a collector’s first purchase for the obvious reason, they are less expensive. As single works of art, they can be that final elegant touch in fine décor. At the other end of the spectrum, a wall of miniatures makes for an impressive display of a collector’s unique range of style and interest. Each SmallWork is created with the same precision as all Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Editions, signed by the artist and numbered as a collectible limited edition.

22. John Buxton GOD´S GIFT   $695.00

GOD´S GIFT - The bold, brave pioneers had no assurances as they drove westward into unknown territory. What awaited them were both a comfort and a miracle. In 18th century America, the untamed land answered the prayers of traders and settlers alike. The woods teemed with game, the soil proved rich and fertile and streams of life-giving water blessed the mountainsides. The artist researches his subjects extensively in order to create an accurate, historical image. This perfectly composed, breathtakingly detailed scene reveals why many consider John Buxton the pre-eminent artist of early America.

23. John Buxton GOD´S GIFT   $395.00

GOD´S GIFT - The bold, brave pioneers had no assurances as they drove westward into unknown territory. What awaited them were both a comfort and a miracle. In 18th century America, the untamed land answered the prayers of traders and settlers alike. The woods teemed with game, the soil proved rich and fertile and streams of life-giving water blessed the mountainsides. The artist researches his subjects extensively in order to create an accurate, historical image. This perfectly composed, breathtakingly detailed scene reveals why many consider John Buxton the pre-eminent artist of early America.

24. John Buxton The Ceremonial Pipe   $475.00

The Ceremonial Pipe - “Remembering my ancestors” is the phrase spoken to John Buxton (who painted "The Ceremonial Pipe & Artist Benjamin West") by a Seneca friend of the Iroquois nation who made the replica of a calumet, or ceremonial pipe, which is shown in this painting. This contemporary Seneca honored his Native American heritage as he created this masterful quillwork inspired by their original pieces. In the painting, one of the Iroquois presents a calumet to the curious who are gathered around a flat rock fire pit. One of the men holds common clay, or “tavern,” pipes that were traded with the white men. Meat hangs on the fire. This might be a common public scene on a warm afternoon in eastern Pennsylvania. In the right background, the eighteenth-century American-born artist Benjamin West observes with his sketch pad. Years later, several of West’s paintings, including Portrait of Colonel Guy Johnson, featured a calumet just like this that he had acquired in his early Pennsylvania days.

25. John Buxton Lost and Found for Bounty   $395.00

Lost and Found for Bounty - Despite the insurmountable odds, harsh discipline or unbearable circumstances British soldiers were occasionally driven to the desperate act of deserting into the vast colonial wilderness. There are accounts recorded from as early as the 18th Century. To help capture these run-a-ways during the French and Indian War, the use of allied Indians began in earnest after 1760. One of the most successful captures involved the return of 14 men taken by the Seneca in 1762. Some of these deserters were of the 60th Royal American Regiment ― as seen in this painting ― and were returned to their commandant at Fort Niagara on Lake Ontario. Another instance can be found in this account from in the papers of Colonel Henry Bouquet: Lieut. Carre to Col. Bouquet ― Venango ― Aug. 15 1761 "Sir, I have sent under the care of the bearer, Corporal Roller, Phillip Dill of Major Walters Company, who deserted from Niagara the 12th of July & was brought here by an Indian who took him up near Custaloga's; as the Indian insisted much to have his reward in Rum, I promised that he should have 2 1/2 gallons at Fort Pitt (where he will be in a few days) in case you approve of it. The Deserter says there was another man came off with him, whom he left in the woods near Presqu'isle so weak that he could not proceed & that he advised him to deliver himself up at Presqu'isle . . . ." "Lost and Found for Bounty" is a Fine Art Canvas that captures John Buxton’s incredible play of light in a dark forest coupled with raw, intense emotion. No one captures light and or stages a scene in a painting as skillfully as Buxton and few other painters pay such attention to historic detail.

26. John Buxton The Uninvited   $450.00

The Uninvited - Winner of the Western Art Collector Magazine Award This early frontier scene of a tranquil wilderness waterway reflects an eastern woodland Indian’s suspicion of any unannounced presence to his domain. A group of unknowns has silently glided into view from an adjoining stream. Although they may be brothers, they could also be hostile to his clan. Cautious observation is prudent. He does not know the design of their canoe nor their dress. Are they ally or foe? He remains secluded, suspicious and out-numbered. The five and later six nations of the Iroquois controlled much of what is today western New York and Pennsylvania. Those who used or traversed these areas only did so with a clear understanding that they needed permission.