The Collection Shop Limited Edition Art

1-800-206-3715
USA & Canada
Toll Free

A value is required.Minimum number of characters not met.Exceeded maximum number of characters.

1. Howard Terpning The Second Geronimo Campaign MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $950.00

On September 5, 1886, Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles sent a telegram to his superiors in Washington, D.C. announcing that the 16-month war with Geronimo was finally over. This marked the end of 25-years of intermittent warfare between the Chiricahua Apaches and the United States. Without Apache scouts (which included Western Apaches), chances are the military would not have accomplished this.

Geronimo’s final campaign began on May 17, 1885, with 143 followers, 41 of whom were fighting men. War weary or unhappy with Geronimo, the balance of the tribe, some 385 individuals, had stayed on the reservation. Hoping to put a quick end to the war, many of the remaining Chiricahua men actually enlisted as scouts. They were led by Chatto, a 40-year-old chief. Pursuing Geronimo was a dangerous task he recalled, “I carried a double cartridge belt with 45 to 50 cartridges on each belt. My rifle was loaded and my finger on the trigger following fresh tracks of hostiles, not knowing when a bullet might go through my forehead.”

This Greenwich Workshop MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas of The Second Geronimo Campaign is a powerful piece of history. Content, scale and collectability combine to make ownership a premium on this Howard Terpning work of art.

2. Howard Terpning Caution Born of Necessity   $395.00

Plains Indian life was not the idyllic at-peace-with-the-world existence some romanticists would like us to believe. The Indian lived with constant exposure to the elements, to hunger and privation and the less-than-tender mercies of enemy neighbors. Like the wild animals among whom he lived and from whom he took careful lessons in survival, he developed a strong sense of watchfulness, of caution.

As a storyteller, Terpning is able to use the simple task of getting water as a vivid example of the tenuous nature of Plains Indian life. As an artist, the water provides Terpning with the ability to create a great abstract form that leaps out from this work, driven by the cool reflections of the river and the man leaning hesitantly forward. His reflection in the water and that of his horse, form a part of that dynamic shape. The slight touches of light upon the horse make this vivid work complete.

3. Howard Terpning The Trackers   $1250.00

“Over the years, I have seen many come and visit, yet most miss the obvious opportunities to truly see and hear the unique qualities of our tribal homeland,” relates Blackfoot Daryl Kipp in his introduction of Howard Terpning’s A Tribute to the Plains People. “Howard’s paintings serve an important role for their profound portrayal of Indian people, which help capture the ever-fading image of early-day Native America.”

Terpning’s description of The Trackers is such an observation, “Scenes such as this played out countless times in the 18th and 19th centuries. We don't know who they are tracking, but they do not seem to sense immediate danger because they don’t have their bows in hand. They see signs among the rocks, such as a broken twig or displaced moss. We do know that they won't give up their search ― whether they find the enemy they are seeking, we will never know.”

It is the power of Terpning’s artistic skill that enables these observations to be all the more profound. The Trackers is just the type of work to which Kipp refers. Two men inhabit a beautiful, pristine landscape. Howard conveys subtly, but implicitly, these men’s tie to it. For generations this has been their land and any disturbance to it will be noted and pursued.

At 30 x 32, this fine art gicle canvas presents brushstroke from brushstroke all the color and finesse of The Trackers original. Would you like to see this fine art edition in the comfort of your home before you buy? Check into our Try It at Home program.

4. Howard Terpning The Rivers Gift MASTERWORK EDITION ON   $1250.00

Opportunity and misfortune often traveled hand in hand in the Old West as Howard Terpning’s The River’s Gift so dramatically displays. Where are the pioneers who came west with this wagon? What were their dreams and desires? Did they reach the end of their trail forsaken and forlorn, like the shattered wood of the wagon?

Yet for these two Cheyenne, their find represents good fortune. They will strip the iron rims to make spear points and arrowheads. The spokes and the other wood will also prove to be useful. Perhaps, along the river’s bottom and edge, more bounty can be found.

The River’s Gift is not only masterful storytelling, it is masterfully designed and rendered as well. The massive wall of rock behind the Cheyenne keeps the eye from drifting off into the distance. The angle of the riders and the gap in the wall serve to drive your attention down to the river. Each rock is strategically placed to draw your eye to the broken wagon, which in turn directs you once again to the Cheyenne.

Presented as a gorgeous, over-sized MasterWork® Gicle canvas with a low edition, The River’s Gift is a prime example of why Howard Terpning is as sought-after and collected as passionately as he is.

5. Howard Terpning Calling the Buffalo Limited Edition   $295.00

The indomitable power of the human spirit binds mankind. We can recognize and identify with this across nationality, geography and time. Howard Terpning’s ability to capture and express this in his art is what attracts us to his paintings and sets them apart from others. We share his awe for the beauty of our world in The Force of Nature Humbles All Men, the burden of leadership in Chief Joseph Rides to Surrender and the expression of this Blackfoot medicine man’s belief and faith in Terpning’s newest release, Calling The Buffalo.

6. Howard Terpning The Family Home SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $295.00

The painted area around the bottom of the tipi cover is referred to as the Bottom Skirt and therefore symbolized Father Sky. All human events were contained between these two boundaries-Mother Earth below and Father Earth Above.

Owners of a painted tipi treasured it more as a religious symbol than as an aesthetic creation. Each design protected the family inside and was intended to help them live happy, successful and safe lives.

Family Home, a new SmallWorks® by Howard Terpning, lets us know that we are in a Blackfoot camp from the designs on the lodges. Mountain peaks decorate the base of the central tipi, the first of three bands usually found on a painted tipi. Bottom skirt designs used patterns that symbolized Earth’s surface. This paid spiritual tribute to the importance of Mother Earth. Designs at the tops of painted tipis represented the upper limit of the physical world, here a blue stripe for the sky and a red strip for life. The middle band could one day contain pictographs of war exploits or symbols that the family found important or lucky.

Family Home is a beautiful SmallWorks® Fine Art Canvas from The Greenwich Workshop. A colorful gem and unique scene of camp life from Howard Terpning, this edition is a perfect acquisition for the long time Terpning collector or first time buyer.

7. Howard Terpning Bear Tracks   $650.00

If you had any doubt about the story in this painting, the firearms and weapons that these Native American hunters carry are ample evidence of their intent. Great Plains grizzly bears have been extinct for over 100 years but when this species was abundant, a bear kill was a mark of great bravery and a grizzly claw necklace was a coveted trophy and prized possession. Even with the rifle, taking a grizzly down was no easy hunt since the bear could take a bullet or two and still keep coming. There are scores of Native American legends about bear and the bear track symbol on clothing and other artifacts, considered a good omen.

Terpning made sure that the bear track was accurate through his characteristic research, which in this case meant a visit with the finished painting to his close friend Bob Kuhn (who said the painting of the bear track was exactly right). The focal point of the image is the light area with the bear track. From there the eye moves up to the pinto’s white and dark markings. The riders on the light field with the shadowed pines make a study unto themselves. The large tree fallen in the foreground reinforces the angle of the bow cases and bows making for an elegant vertical composition.

8. Howard Terpning White Man Fire Sticks Limited Edition   $275.00

Warriors engaged in battle, a fine art first for Howard Terpning. It is a moment captured with a veteran’s eye: rarely does a soldier see or aware of much in battle except what happens immediately around him. This is a classic Terpning, subtle and elegant to the eye because of a powerful and complex design beneath. It is a merging of The Long Shot and The Force of Nature Humbles All Man.

White Man Fire Sticks was the last painting Howard completed before his phenomenally successful one-man retrospective A Tribute to the Plains People. It was an image never before seen by the public and it was one of the most popular at the show.

“The Native people were awestruck when they first saw firearms carried by the white man and how destructive they were” Terpning says. “The early muskets were smooth bore flintlocks and, for their time, were very effective although such a weapon took time to re-load as opposed to the use of the bow and arrows.

“To the first Americans, they seemed to be sticks that shot fire out of one end. These two Blackfoot warriors are engaged in a small skirmish with their enemy, possibly the Flatheads. This area is near the Swan River in the Flathead Valley of Montana.”

White Man Fire Sticks is a rare action piece from Howard Terpning and the response to it has extremely enthusiastic. It will be made available as two Fine Art Editions. The striking MasterWork® Canvas is at 29 x 39 in an edition of 125. A beautiful and very affordable Paper Gicle measures 17 x 23 and is part of an edition of 175.

Whether you are a longtime Terpning collector or considering purchasing your first, White Man Fire Sticks is an investment well worth making.

9. Howard Terpning Yapping Dogs SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $295.00

When you visit the retrospective Howard Terpning: A Tribute to the Plains People at The Autry National Center, you will find that Terpning’s SmallWorks® and miniatures are as important as the larger works of any collection. Many a collector’s initial purchase is a miniature: the first jewel that opened the door to the joy of collecting. SmallWorks® also complete any fine art display with that final elegant touch.

Yapping Dogs was unveiled at the 2012 Settlers West Miniature Show in Tucson, AZ and was an immediate sensation. “This Chiricahua Apache warrior is returning to camp down river with his pack horse laden with goods that he may have obtained in trade, but we will never know for sure,” explains Terpning. “Every camp had many dogs always present to complain or greet old friends upon their arrival. Both Cochise and Geronimo were Chiricahua and this band of Apache was the last to oppose the U.S. government’s control of their ancestral lands.”

This 12 x 9 SmallWorks® Fine Art Edition Gicle canvas offers the collector or first time buyer a point of easy and affordable access to owning the work of one of the most important painters of our time.

10. Howard Terpning Broken Trail   $1250.00

“These two Northern Plains warriors are following a trail that was probably a game trail originally,” Terpning relates about the painting. “Since they are using a pack horse, they are no doubt traveling a considerable distance. Snow melt or heavy rains could sometimes produce such a volume of water that it wiped away everything in its path. This landscape has been changed by the destructive forces of the water and what used to be a natural bridge of sorts has been completely washed away, so that these men must seek another route to reach their destination.”

This painting, and over 80, others will be on display in Howard Terpning: Tribute to the Plains People, a retrospective museum show opening May 12, 2012 at the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, CA. Collectors will only have through July 1, 2012 to view this once-in-a-lifetime hanging of this many Terpning originals. Truly, by visiting this show, you will understand just why we refer to Howard as a “national treasure”. And, luck visitors will also have the chance to see just how exceptional a Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Edition of Howard Terpning’s work can be.

About the only downside of Terpning’s success is the lack of availability of his original work to even the most serious collector. It has been through our Fine Art Edition program that a broader, albeit select, audience has been able to enjoy the beauty, though exacting reproduction, of Howard’s work. Broken Trail is no exception. This 34” x 23” canvas captures every detail and nuance of this master’s original work. Broken Trail will be made available to collectors in an edition of only 125.

Make your plans to see the Autry’s upcoming Terpning retrospective this May or June and don’t wait until then to purchase Broken Trail. By spring, this edition will be hanging on the walls of a lucky few collectors and like many previous Terpning’s editions, it will be sold out and unavailable to even the most serious collector.

11. Howard Terpning Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People Limited Edition   $295.00

You know a painting is special when it’s the piece in an exhibition that the collectors just stand in front of for a long period of time and simply don’t say word. And, they keep coming back to do it again and again. If interrupted, they’ll return to it, intent on having the opportunity to enjoy a great work of art.
And in case we hadn’t picked up on that at the Masters of the American West art show this past February, the phone calls coming in to ask us, “When are you going to release it as a Fine Art Edition?” were certainly another clue that demand would be high for this particular gicle canvas.
The winner of the 2011 Thomas Moran Award for Painting, Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is a magnificent work. Terpning begins with a simple common premise; the grandeur of nature can be sacred. He relates that emotion not by creating a landscape painting, but by focusing on the reverence these men have for what they see. The petroglyphs show that this is an ancient understanding. These men knew it to be so in their time, just as we do today. Their silence, as they take in the wonder about them, is not unlike that of the collectors we saw view this work for the first time.
“Petroglyphs on rock formations indicate that the visitors are in a spiritual place,” describes Howard Terpning, “a place blessed by the long-ago people. Numerous locations like this exist throughout Montana and Wyoming, sometimes high on a mountain with a spectacular view of Mother Earth. For centuries, Indian people have made the journey to these sacred places to give thanks for their blessings and to pray for success in hunting and in battle. Today, they continue to visit these sacred places as their forebears did, leaving small pieces of trade cloth and handmade objects decorated with beads or feathers as gifts for the gods.”
Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is available as a Fine Art Canvas. At 33” x 35” it is an impressive work that will majestically fill any large space. Our carefully crafted gicle canvas will give you the experience of owning this great work of art for significantly less than the price the original captured in February. Also available is a more moderately sized and wonderfully priced Fine Art Gicle Paper. Both editions, truly faithful reproductions of the original, are signed by Howard Terpning and numbered.
Collectors who waited too long to commit to last Fall’s The Legend of Geronimo missed out on what is a beautiful (and now hard-to-come-by) canvas or paper edition. Don’t wait too long and miss out again!

12. Howard Terpning Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People   $1450.00

You know a painting is special when it’s the piece in an exhibition that the collectors just stand in front of for a long period of time and simply don’t say word. And, they keep coming back to do it again and again. If interrupted, they’ll return to it, intent on having the opportunity to enjoy a great work of art.
And in case we hadn’t picked up on that at the Masters of the American West art show this past February, the phone calls coming in to ask us, “When are you going to release it as a Fine Art Edition?” were certainly another clue that demand would be high for this particular gicle canvas.
The winner of the 2011 Thomas Moran Award for Painting, Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is a magnificent work. Terpning begins with a simple common premise; the grandeur of nature can be sacred. He relates that emotion not by creating a landscape painting, but by focusing on the reverence these men have for what they see. The petroglyphs show that this is an ancient understanding. These men knew it to be so in their time, just as we do today. Their silence, as they take in the wonder about them, is not unlike that of the collectors we saw view this work for the first time.
“Petroglyphs on rock formations indicate that the visitors are in a spiritual place,” describes Howard Terpning, “a place blessed by the long-ago people. Numerous locations like this exist throughout Montana and Wyoming, sometimes high on a mountain with a spectacular view of Mother Earth. For centuries, Indian people have made the journey to these sacred places to give thanks for their blessings and to pray for success in hunting and in battle. Today, they continue to visit these sacred places as their forebears did, leaving small pieces of trade cloth and handmade objects decorated with beads or feathers as gifts for the gods.”
Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is available as a Fine Art Canvas. At 33” x 35” it is an impressive work that will majestically fill any large space. Our carefully crafted gicle canvas will give you the experience of owning this great work of art for significantly less than the price the original captured in February. Also available is a more moderately sized and wonderfully priced Fine Art Gicle Paper. Both editions, truly faithful reproductions of the original, are signed by Howard Terpning and numbered.
Collectors who waited too long to commit to last Fall’s The Legend of Geronimo missed out on what is a beautiful (and now hard-to-come-by) canvas or paper edition. Don’t wait too long and miss out again!

13. Howard Terpning Hawk Feathers SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $245.00

Elevating the nobility of the human spirit defines the fine art of Howard Terpning. Through intuition and insight what begins as a simple portrait becomes a masterful representation of Native American dignity.
Hawk Feathers is not this Northern Plains Indian’s name, but rather, the adornment he wears in his hair. The hunting ability of the hawk was highly respected and its feathers were considered good medicine. Nearly every North American tribe used hawk feathers as a badge of honor and they were worn a good part of the time. This tribal member is also shown wearing his buffalo robe. Unlike Europeans, the plains people fashioned their robes with the fur on the inside and the smooth side of the hide facing out.

Hawk Feathers is a classic SmallWorks by Howard Terpning that sits side by side with any full-sized work of art. SmallWorks Editions are the most affordable way to collect the Giclee canvases of Howard Terpning. Only by owning the original could you possess a finer piece of art, so don’t let this gem disappear before you order yours!

14. Howard Terpning Horse of a Different Color   $495.00

“I once read an account of a Cheyenne warrior who painted his body and his horse’s body entirely blue,” says Howard Terpning. “Just imagine the startling effect that must have had on his enemies as he charged them in battle. That description gave me the idea for the title (which seemed obvious). Adding the warrior’s son in the painting felt logical and gave the picture a higher level of human interest. To have listened in on the father and son conversation as this warrior prepared himself for battle would have been something.”

As we made the selection of this painting to reproduce, it occurred to us that this is the first Terpning work we have published that focused so directly on the relationship between a father and a son. It surprised us that there were actually so few paintings he had done on the subject. We think that makes this release kind of special. By the way, Howard’s son Steven modeled for the boy.

15. Howard Terpning Light Cavalry SMALLWORK EDITION ON   $225.00

“The Apache were great horsemen,” says artist Howard Terpning. “All the Plains Indians were. This group of tribesmen travels between the mountains with only the clothes on their backs and a minimum of equipmenta far cry from the so-called ‘light cavalry’ of the American army.”

To understand the relationship between the Native American and the horse is no easy feat, but, true to form, Howard Terpning has delivered.

16. Howard Terpning Medicine Shields of the Blackfoot   $750.00

Among the Blackfoot people the shield was the most cherished and protective possession. Above all, it was a medicine object. Medicine shields have dream or vision origins. Making a shield could be a lengthy process involving several people, but it had to start with the hide taken from the neck and shoulder of a bull buffalo. Once the hair was removed, this thick hide was then placed over a fire pit filled with hot stones and staked to the ground. The heat of the stones would gradually shrink the hide until it was about one inch thick. It was then painted and decorated to conform with the owner’s dream. When the shield was not carried by the owner on a war party, it was supported on a tripod outside the tepee on sunny days, and as the sun moved, the tripod was turned so that the face of the shield would always be in direct sunlight.

17. Howard Terpning Medicine Horse Mask   $975.00

From Howard Terpning, one of the most important artists in America, comes this stunning canvas featuring three Crow warriors preparing for an adventure. The head masks (or face masks) worn by horses were usually made for leading warriors and were considered medicine objects that gave power, protection and strength to the horse and its rider. The masks often had beautiful quill work, beads and feathered adornment and their design was sometimes inspired by a vision. Central to Native American medicine is the belief that each human, and every object, has a corresponding presence in the spirit world. These spirits can promote health, wisdom, and even success in battle.

18. Howard Terpning Three Generations   $975.00

An extended family of Crow women is portrayed in Three Generations. Skilled in the many demanding domestic tasks of their culture, these tribeswomen passed their traditions down from one generation to the next, ensuring the future of their tribe and customs. In this family portrait, the distinctive and expressive faces of the grandmother, mother and granddaughter are unique and yet universal. The middle generation carries the weight of responsibility with dignity, the elder, perhaps, now knows joy in understanding the circle of all life and the adolescent is in that awkward stage we see in many of our own family portraits!

Howard Terpning, one of the most renowned and honored artists of our time, paints the heritage and culture of Native Americans, and in particular, the Plains Indians. Grandfather Speaks and The Teachings of My Grandmother are other recent (sold out) fine art canvas prints that focus on the importance of elders to the family life of the Plains Indian.

19. Howard Terpning War Chief   $275.00

Among the plains warriors, the war chief became a leader because of his proven success in battle, relates Howard Terpning. If his war party's returned to camp victorious, he would have an easier time recruiting warriors to participate in subsequent raids. These men were very brave and fierce which is the feeling that I tried to portray in this painting.

20. Howard Terpning BLESSING FROM THE MEDICINE MAN   $950.00

Thunderstorms rumble across the plains indicating winter’s end and the onset of spring. The People, as the Blackfoot refer to themselves, use this as the signal to gather for the Thunder Pipe Ceremony, a celebration of spring rains, renewed life and good health. This sacred pipe, according to legend, was a gift to the People from the spirit of Thunder, who the Blackfeet believed was one of the mightiest manifestations of the All Powerful One. This gift was passed down through a succession of keepers. When a date for the opening of a pipe bundle is announced, four drummers are notified and a shaman is appointed. Arrangements are made for the feast and the sacred berry soup. The ceremony is held in two lodges placed face to face. The ceremony, likened to the fertility rites of other ancient peoples, is highly structured and the ritual is split between participants and spectators. The pipe bundle is unwrapped only after a morning of prayers and song. After a great feast, the ceremony continues for those who are authorized to dance with the pipe in order to receive its power. At the ceremony’s end, spectators were allowed to come forward and receive individual blessings from the medicine man, bestowed with four sacred streaks of red pigment, placed on the forehead, each cheek and chin. While these markings seem representative of the four directions, the certainty of their meaning lies with the medicine man.

21. Howard Terpning CHEYENNE MOTHER   $695.00

"A nation is not conquered Until the hearts of its women are on the ground. Then it is finished, No matter how brave its warriors Or how strong their weapons." — Cheyenne proverb Award-winning CA Emeritus artist Howard Terpning captures the solemn pride — and tenderness — of a young Cheyenne mother. She poses in her everyday dress of doeskin, a cradleboard secured to her back by straps around her chest and shoulders. From her belt hangs a knife in an elaborately fringed and beaded sheath.

22. Howard Terpning GRANDFATHER SPEAKS   $875.00

0 “Among all the Plains Indians,” Howard Terpning explains, “grandparents were revered by the young children for their wisdom and knowledge. These Blackfoot children listen intently as their grandfather speaks; later, when they have grandchildren of their own, the listeners will be the storytellers, keeping their oral history alive.” Howard practically swept the awards at the annual Cowboy Artists of America exhibition in 1998. His works took the gold in the categories of Oil, Water Solubles and Drawing and Other Media. Terpning’s originals are virtually inaccessible except to a very few, one of many reasons why his giclee canvases present an exceptional collecting opportunity

23. Howard Terpning OFFERINGS TO SUN   $950.00

The spiritual nature of the Plains Indians led them to create holy places to which they would go to commune with those spirits that guided their lives or to feel close to what some called the Sure-Enough Father. Native American friends took artist Howard Terpning to such a place on the Blackfeet Reservation south of Browning, Montana. For generations and generations, the Blackfeet had been going into the woods and attaching small offerings to tree trunks and branches. In earlier times these would have been such rarities as eagle feathers, ermine tails or medicine bundles containing items of religious significance. In modern times swatches of cloth are an accepted substitute, respectfully maintaining the custom of ancestors.

24. Howard Terpning Sunset for the Comanche MASTERWORK   $2450.00

Artist Howard Terpning’s paintings of the American West have depicted some of the most dramatic and moving events in the history of the Plains People. In "Sunset for the Comanche," Terpning’s brush recalls the valiant struggle by the Comanche people to retain their land, their freedom and their way of life. “The Comanche people ruled the Southern Plains until the last quarter of the 19th Century,” relates the artist. Their warriors were said to be some of the best horsemen in the world and yet constant warfare and broken treaties drastically reduced their numbers. The Quohadi (the antelope clan) were the last of the people to surrender. To me, this scene represents the symbol of their strength as they clung to their old way of life as a warrior society. The sun is low on the horizon and the cottonwood trees cast long shadows that forebode the demise of their culture as they know it.”

25. Howard Terpning THE BONNET CASE   $750.00

These northern Plains men may be getting ready for a ceremonial function that calls for the use of a bonnet. A bonnet case was typically made of rawhide and could store feathered headgear or even occasionally personal "medicine" -objects that people of the Plains believed gave them control over natural or spiritual forces.

26. Howard Terpning Vanishing Pony Tracks Masterworks   $2250.00

“Horse stealing was a sport among the Plains Indians and an important way to gain honor and prestige among other members of their tribe,” says Terpning. “The man in the foreground has his horse stealing medicine attached to his belt with a miniature rope. These four Blackfoot warriors had been following a large band of trappers, waiting for the right moment to capture some of their stock. They no doubt took these ponies in the middle of the night and are now trying to put as much distance as they can between them-selves and the trappers who are certainly attempting to track the Blackfoot and take their ponies back. These raiders are using every ruse to elude their pursuers including crossing the river in hopes that their tracks will be lost or at least delay their pursuers.”

27. Howard Terpning ARMY REGULATIONS   $235.00

These are four Shoshoni who volunteered to be cavalry scouts. They liked adventure and when everything else was disappearing in their culture, they opted for this as an alternative. They were very, very good at it. The painting shows the transition - an attempt at assimilation - from one culture to the other. Of course, it never worked. There were regiments in the Wyoming/Montana area who used Shoshoni scouts but this flag is of an undesignated regiment. The same is true of the location; a lot of landscape would have detracted from the purpose of the painting so the background was kept simple to enable the viewer to concentrate on these four men.

28. Howard Terpning SIGNALS IN THE WIND   $225.00

A Blackfeet party studies a far-off message . . . . According To Terpning, Plains Indians often used smoke signals to communicate across great distances. The smoke was not normally used in the complex manner of Morse code but usually had a specific meaning agreed upon beforehand between senders and receivers. The signal here could convey any number of things: sighting of buffalo, for example, discovery of an enemy or simply provide a rallying point for scattered parties. Howard has painted few winter scenes, including "Chief Joseph Rides to Surrender" and "Winter Coat," but those he’s done have Sold Out at Publisher and we suspect that’s because collectors share his conviction not to romanticize the world of the Plains Indians. Their land, he reminds us, was not always lush, green and filled with plenty.

29. Howard Terpning THE WEATHER DANCER DREAM   $225.00

"Originally I was going to paint 'The Weather Dancer' in an interior setting, but the very image of the finished painting came to me very late one night when I was fast asleep. Hence the title, 'The Weather Dancer Dream . . .'" Combining his artistry with his subconscious instinct, Terpning captures the glory of the Blackfoot Weather Dancer — a priestly figure charged with the responsibility to keep the weather favorable at the Sundance Ceremony. The majesty of Terpning's art matches the majesty of a man who could part a storm —standing amidst a deluge without being dampened before the rain would come to an inexplicable but merciful end.

30. Howard Terpning WAR STORIES   $225.00

In the mid-1870s, the U. S. Army often employed Crow scouts to help patrol the western territories. The work had its dangers but there were also days of quiet routine. This is a scene that might have been repeated many times during those years: soldiers and scouts pausing to rest under the midday sun. The scout sitting on the ground has unfolded an elk hide and is recounting his war deeds painted there. The officer is listening beside him and the trooper in the background wear civilian hats. Military issue tended not to hold up to the rigors of army life. The scout wears a civilian shirt, as Native Americans commonly did at that time, as well as his war medicine amulet and necklace.